Farrar’s Barbadian love story

The wonder that is Worthings Beach

He is orginally from Leeds, Yorkshire.

But Englishman Roy Farrar is as Bajan as you can get, without being born in Barbados.

The repeat visitor, who has been coming to the island for over 30 years now, had made well over 40 visits to his home away from home, where he generally waits out the winter months.

“I like to think of myself as more than just a visitor,” Farrar proudly proclaimed during a recent interview with Barbados TODAY.

“[In fact] everyone says when they find out how long I have been here, ‘you’re a Bajan, where’s your citizenship?’” he quipped, adding that “it wouldn’t be a bad idea [except that] it takes two three, days to get it, and then another three four weeks before it is approved.”

Roy Farrar

Roy, who usually spends four months of the year here, has been around long enough to appreciate not only how the immigration system works, but pretty much how everything functions – or not – in Barbados.

Therefore, you wouldn’t find him at any of the official receptions for repeat visitors put on by the Prime Minister at Ilaro Court.

For one, that is not his scene as he would much rather be mingling informally with the locals and tourists, as he is known to do in the Worthing Beach community.

In fact, you can call him the resident photographer, as Farrar has built up quite the reputation there for capturing the most spectacular moments from the balcony of his guesthouse and freely sharing them with whoever comes into the focus of his long lens.

Farrar also has a knack for being in the right place at the right time, and capturing the most gorgeous sunsets, skylines, and amid clear signs of ruin, the beauty that still is Barbados.

Roy Farrar’s view of the moon.
One of the gorgeous sunsets from Roy Farrar’s Worthing balcony.
This fly-pass was taken, as usual, from Roy Farrar’s balcony on Worthing Beach on the evening of October 11th, 2017.

This is why you could well appreciate it when he says, not just for criticism sake, that the “tourist board seems to be locked into itself rather than looking outside” and that it “looks inward, rather than out”.

After all, you would sooner see Farrar walking up and down the beach on mornings, liming in a bar or taking a ZR into Bridgetown, before you come across a single tourism official on the street – not to mention the fact that he is himself a repeat visitor.

So if there is anyone our Minister of Tourism should be listening to it is him, when he says it is not the reception at Ilaro that matters.

“What difference does it make if a tourist has been coming for 30 years? Yes, it is a nice way of saying thank you, but really the tourists that matter are every one of them – whether they are coming for a week or whether they are coming for months like I do,” he said.

“It is not cheap and it is not easy [to come here]. Most of the tourists who come spend eight to ten hours, and some of them 24 hours to get here, but when they get here they are not always welcome,” he said, suggesting that this was where the island’s tourism energies needed to be focused.

His first visit to Barbados was really by accident. Farrar and his then wife used to go to the Canary Islands, which he described as “fabulously warm”. However, as fate would have it, during one of their planned holidays they couldn’t get a flight because it was fully booked.

“We were given the choice of going to either in St Petersburg in Florida or coming down to Barbados.

Well in those days, Barbados was seen as the English prize.

“In those days, 30 years ago, to go to Barbados the English, certainly the British thought, ‘well, you must be a millionaire’. It was in the Caribbean, this magic island that only British Airways went to, but we decided let us give it a try and we came down for three weeks.”

Immediately, he was struck by the warmth of the people.

“In those days there was warmth and people did have time . . . and we just couldn’t get down fast enough the following year and we met people, other tourists who have been coming for years and years and it just built up, friendships built up and the time I spend down here over the Christmas, New Year period, it is just like being at home,” Farrar told Barbados TODAY.

In fact, as a result of his repeat visits, he now admits to knowing more people in the Worthings Beach area than he knows back in his hometown in Leeds.

Through his link with Barbados, friends have visited him in England and he and his wife, now deceased, also went over to Canada and the United States.

In recent months Worthings Beach has become synonymous with all manner of sewage problems.

But for Farrar, it is still one of the most special places on earth. In fact, he believes the beach itself has special healing properties, so while he usually takes weekends off to go to the Crane and to explore other parts of the island which he now equally knows like the back of his hand, Worthing Beach is still his home away from home.

“From the first time we came, we stayed on Worthing Beach and it is strange how the beach has changed,” said Farrar, explaining that “at that time, Worthing Beach was a real wild beach.

“The sea did come crashing in and there were days when you couldn’t walk down the beach because it was so high. So of course, Accra, or as we call it Rockley Beach, was the beach at that time.”

Since then the area has undergone infrastructural development, including the addition of the Accra Beach Hotel and Farrar, who initially stayed at Cacrabank Beach Apartments, which has since been renamed the Blue Orchid, has since switched to Vista Villas over the past 22 years, even though he said Blue Orchid “must have had the best balcony as far as I’m concerned in Barbados at that time”.

Asked why he has not tired of Barbados and keeps coming back, Farrar said: “Now it is as much a habit as anything to come to Barbados.

“Where else can you go and get the sun and the sea and the warmth?” he said, while lamenting that the people are not as friendly as they once were and that the island had undergone some negative changes over the past 30 years.

However, he was quick to add that “I don’t think this is just Barbados by the way, I think this is how the world is shrinking so much and so much to do.

“The warmth is still there, but it takes a lot of delving to get it out of the people these days,” he said.

Still the Worthing community has managed to hold on to some of the warmth that Farrar says is now lacking in general.

“From December to the end of March, Worthing does become its own little village.

“You walk the beach you know everybody on the beach. Everybody knows you. And it is renewing friendships. Coming for as long as I do, I meet all of the people who come down in that period so it is almost every week, renewing friendships.

“Odd enough today, it is a very big goodbye to at least six couples who happen to be going back today – some to Canada, some to America others to Britain and this morning I was walking down the beach and popping in saying, ‘See you next year’, and they were all, ‘Oh yeah, God willing we will be back next year,’” he reported at the time of the interview.

Farrar said for him, “the biggest thing I come down here for, which might sound silly, is that I know I am going to be rejuvenated by two months and that is amazing.”

Many times he sits on the balcony videotaping and photographing the people that have just arrived.

“Most of them are well into their 70s and into the 90s. There is one woman down there who is 99. Still does her own swimming, her own walking and everything, but they come down and they are walking the beach with their walking stick. Three or four days later you find that they have still got the walking stick but they are not struggling, they are just walking,” said Farrar, who insists there is therapeutic value from regular visits to the beach.

“You can go down to Worthing and you could actually film from the end of December to mid March and take note of the people coming, give them a week at the most and see the rejuvenation. It is incredible!

“It is absolutely incredible to see them a couple weeks later. They don’t even have a walking stick.

“I think it is the atmosphere, the sea, the beautiful clear air and the warmth that gets the joints going.

Farrar, who turns 77 this year, said: “I don’t feel anywhere near it and I would at least take seven to ten years off of that because of coming to Barbados over the past 30 years,” he said.

However, while beachside is heaven, roadside is “hell” because of the noise.

“It is more or less a race track. It is certainly a race track for the Number 11s . . .It is a ZR racetrack from Oistins to Bridgetown,” he said.

“Cutting in, cutting out and cutting other cars from half past five in the morning, it is ZRs and from two, three o’clock in the morning, you get the motor bikes or the race cars and they sit at the lights at the bottom of Rendezvous and they race down toward Rockley and I mean screaming. You have got the older gears, so it starts crackling. It is like gunfire.”

Incidentally, his last visit came a week after the recent sewage problem developed.

However, Farrar was not put off by it, simply because for him, it is nothing new.

“I know how bad it was but I have been there 30 years, it is nothing new. The swamp has always been like that. Sometimes you dreaded going into the sea because it is filthy, but you give it a couple of days and it is fine. I don’t know why they thought this year was different to any other,” he said.

A very quiet day back in February at the Graeme Hall Swamp.

“It used to be number one in the number two business, but all you did is just held your breath until it passed, so I really thought it was a bit of a panic,” he said.

However, he acknowledged that some people did cancel, and to receiving enquiries from friends who wanted to know if it was still safe to visit.

“Where could you go that you wouldn’t have this?” he said, adding that it was the same with the crime situation.

Therefore, he intends to keep coming and coming, back to his island home.

kaymarjordan@barbadostoday.bb

30 Responses to Farrar’s Barbadian love story

  1. Liz Clarke October 25, 2017 at 4:11 am

    Morning, from a wet England,

    What a lovely story, myself and my husband Scott have been visiting Barbados since our honeymoon in 1982. we have returned many times with friends , family and our 2 children. in fact we are flying out 30th Oct only for a 7 days just to relax and chill from both of us having very stressful jobs. Can’t wait and counting down the hours.

    We love every thing about Barbados and the rum helps too! ..lol

    Reply
  2. Cheryl Alleyne-Brooks
    Cheryl Alleyne-Brooks October 25, 2017 at 6:20 am

    Such a beautiful story, from such a beautiful person. You love Bim and Bim loves you back. Big thank you and by the way, those pics are amazing, you should find a way to share more of them.

    Reply
  3. Sophia Lewis
    Sophia Lewis October 25, 2017 at 6:51 am

    “The people are not as friendly” I suppose this is ok. After all we’re not as bad as?

    Reply
  4. Paul and carol October 25, 2017 at 9:10 am

    Roy is just a fixture on our beach ..we go down for three months each year and look forward to seeing him ,year round he sends us the most beautiful pics…..

    Yes Barbados is a great spot however if the government wants to retain their number one industry, they have to sharpen up on a lot of areas..noise on the streets is ridiculous , garbage thrown everywhere (they need to fine the offenders), food prices, entertainment and restaurant prices are bad but we return each year as he does for the sun , the sea and the rest…as the song says….beautiful barbados

    Reply
  5. Chris H October 25, 2017 at 9:15 am

    We too have been coming Barbados for 30+ years – we have made many local friends and next year will be bringing 35 friends to celebrate a special birthday and we hope to be returning for many years to come.

    Barbados has changed, but not all for the bad – it is to us home from home, the people are friendly, the bars charming and the quality of restaurants outstanding. Beaches are always clean and tidy (except the Sargasso weed seasons) and facilities in good order.

    We have found that traffic, whilst improved considerably on the the Highways, runs shockingly fast especially on the road from Bridgetown (Paradise Beach) to Speightstown. It seems this important tourist ‘strip’ is treated by both yellow and blue buses as a racetrack and if you find yourself walking on this section of road is quite frightening. Don’t just lay the blame at ZR drivers. There will come a time when there will be deaths of either locals or tourists, but when it is the latter the news will reach our shores and could be damaging to the most important commodity on the island – tourism.

    Someone should be tackling this issue before its too late.

    And whilst on a roll – perhaps a lesson in ‘charm’ could be given to customs and immigration officers – I know they have to keep undesirables out but those of us coming to spend our precious holiday dollars would appreciate a welcoming smile

    Reply
  6. Hartley Alleyne
    Hartley Alleyne October 25, 2017 at 9:26 am

    Always welcome these stories.

    Reply
  7. Lee October 25, 2017 at 10:41 am

    When the 70 to 99 aged people must perforce stop coming because of age related illness or cost increases, Barbados is going to be in “Potta” unless some other reasons for such faithfulness can be found. In my opinion we should be concentrating on the development of medical and therapeutic tourism focusing on the benefits offered by the sea. This man’s experience with rejuvenation in Barbados is compelling evidence that this should be the way forward.

    Reply
  8. Ossie Moore October 25, 2017 at 11:19 am

    Thanks very much for your nice comments Mr.Farrar and a nice and always warm welcome to Barbados ( buhbayudus ) . . . . the racist capital of the Caribbean.

    The piece of 2 x 4 little banana republic rock needs all the good press that it can get and you were awesome at doing just that.

    Enjoy Sir , and it’s a pleasure for ” buhbaydus ” to have someone of your caliber . . . . a gentle man and an awesome photographer ( I’ve got a Canon EOS 7D with a variety of lenses ) .

    Barbados or as the locals say ” buhbaydus ” is the most easterly of all the Caribbean islands , an Isla where you will go to jail for stealing a pint n’ half bottle of rum but can walk away free on murder , drug and gun charges.

    An island where the media and Police describe their own black folks as having :

    (a) a big round head ( black bajans are suppose have square heads )

    (b) a large forehead

    (c) large nose

    (d) protruding teeth

    (e) bow legs

    (f) big eyes ( In England people with big eyes are describe as having beautiful big eyes )

    Since you’ve got everyone’s attention Mr. Farrar please tell them that in England white folks are not trained to hate one another and that the ” Brits ” never ever describe their own in such a derogatory manner.

    Once again Sir , please enjoy another warm ” buhbaydus ” welcome and come again real soon.

    Reply
    • Jennifer October 25, 2017 at 3:02 pm

      Ossie you can really stop with that Oreo effect. If you are black it looks bad and coonish. For an educated person too. Whites don’t train each other to hate each other, they did it to this people. It is like uploading a virus. And the only way to kill the hate is to eradicate the said virus. But you would not see that. If you people had an incling on the relationship between negros and whites you would not even talk if a people was stripped like a banana and a new skin put on what do u expect.

      Reply
  9. MIIB October 25, 2017 at 12:09 pm

    A race that is solely dependent upon another for economic existence sooner or later dies. As we have in the past been living upon the mercies shown by others, and by the chances obtainable, and have suffered there from, so we will in the future suffer if an effort is not made now to adjust our own affairs.

    Marcus Garvey

    Selective amnesia…ummmmmm 9/11 and the catamylist effects. Instead of diversifying the economy we remain trapped waiting on the caucus dollar, so we seek stories, anybody would feel that the coverage of bajans coming in for crop over it stops there. So much barren land, we don’t practice subsistence farming and when grown they cannot compete with cheaper mass imports. Could of sworn they are economic risk gurus to suggest a change seeing the world and Terrorism go hand in hand. Nah, build more plantations like sandals and the new
    Hyatt. how much for a pint of milk or for a chicken?

    I can assure you because of our xenophobic attitude towards Caricom nationals especially Guyanese, Trinidad, jam people and Akebullans as noted from the recent fiasco of staying at Miss ram, the comments, go back home, you live in mud huts etc it’s there off B.B. today archive if you think I am lying.
    we will fall and fall hard regardless of which puppeteer has the strings in our neo colonist government jus a matter of time. To Ray tell your freinds to try the Maldives, Bora Bora, or Thailand….no crime there….think wanna in for a surprise. Barbados is one of the safest places thanks to the diligence and determination of RBPF. Your more than welcome…..hurts my heart to see how we have been brain washed to dig, embarrass and belittle us as a people whilst caucus get a smile, welcome, small chat and a wave through. Be aware that a next generation that coming up in absolute poverty who have abandoned the colonial thinking and guess what…they think for themselves.

    Reply
  10. MIIB October 25, 2017 at 12:17 pm

    @Ossimore…..bbtoday delete my comments, good on ya…you see the equals and never the complete equation- our indoctrinated education, got so much licks for not knowing about Marc polo, Columbus and the thieves you elevate as national heroes, we have a big slave trader in out town standing firm, our hand me down political, judicial, medical, religious institutions with your white caucus god to a nation of black people, the hand me down values and morals from a slave people. But nah they say this and say that…. typical……your comments make pig fodder for pigs….kings and queens about….next time you see a black man, approach him, be brave and say I heard this or heard that from a people that have no souls……

    Reply
    • Jennifer October 25, 2017 at 3:13 pm

      Well said. I hope they know the ancestral tree in the avatar is this people.

      Reply
  11. MIIB October 25, 2017 at 12:27 pm

    Personally, our Tourism authority and bbt has thrown to the wind those from the diaspora, you know, the ones that run home to escape the cold sometimes three times a year or more, the ones that have the port full of barrels, the ones that send western union to alivate the everyday stresses, the ones that return home who invest heavily in cottage industries and open businesses etc….at least black people on the tourism page that ain’t wearing a bow tie or in black n white…we don’t play golf, we don’t spend money, next time fraudell hold a party for returnees, spot the black….we don’t spend our money, and I care nothing about his experience as all of we ain’t colonised with yes Massia no Massia….a new generation is coming that has rubbished colonial thoughts and care nothing about our faux par independence.

    Reply
  12. MIIB October 25, 2017 at 12:38 pm

    Ps. Try Bora Bora, nah I got robbed at knife point there me and my queen by five pagans, maybe Thailand or the Maldives……you in for a surprise, cheek of this caucus bout if it is safe….safest place in the Caricom with a determined well resources and trained tenacious police force with conviction rates success going through the roof…..please don’t feel bound by your white priveledge….explore…..find that place where no crime exist, it is nationalised and the caucus that got recently killed was into contraband and rubbing sohouoders with our criminal elite, in for a shock..crime is universal through to globalisation and the easy movement of contraband. Cheek of these caucus… Osimore, slavery dun, case it slipped past you….. you register what is said
    but when you raping, robbing, slaughtering civilians for resources in throughout your blood stained history….it’s all gravy…you welcome of course but keep them comments on line as avatars increase fake testosterone

    Reply
  13. MIIB October 25, 2017 at 12:41 pm

    You remain oblivious to divide and rule…want examples….

    Stuppppesss

    Reply
  14. Donild Trimp October 25, 2017 at 12:43 pm

    “In recent months Worthings Beach has become synonymous with all manner of sewage problems”.

    — “Farrar was not put off by it, simply because for him, it is nothing new”.

    “I know how bad it was but I have been there 30 years, it is nothing new . The swamp has always been like that. Sometimes you dreaded going into the sea because it is filthy”

    “It used to be number one in the number two business, but all you did is just held your breath until it passed”

    I have a million dollars for anyone who believes this crap from Mr. Farrar.

    Mr. Farrar, how long can you hold your breath?

    Reply
  15. Ossie Moore October 25, 2017 at 12:57 pm

    It’s nice to have people like Mr. Farrah in Barbados and I hope that he takes 10 more of his friends to Barbados next time he visits . One again Sir ,thank you for being a constant visitor to the shores of Barbados.

    But in response to MllB comments , back in the days at St.John the Baptist boys School in Holders Hill, St .James the slave mentality school teachers Glyne ( the madman ) Haynes from Orange Hill in St. James , ” Mr” **hole Roach from Spooners Hill , “Mr” Richards ( Richie Benaud ) and the headmaster “Mr.” L . O used to beat up on us if we didn’t learn about Marco Polo, Christopher Columbus etc.

    Yet still we are right across from the West coast of Africa and we were never taught anything about Africa . We were never taught about the Barbadians that went to Cuba to Cut canes . . . . still a very small bajan population in Cuba , never taught about the Bajans that helped build the Panama Canal . . . still a bajan population in Panama.

    But sure as hell we were taught about The King and Queen of the motherland.

    I was not even aware of it but a ” Brit ” with whom I was visiting B’dos with a few years ago said to me ” bloody hell mate ” ! look at this island , nearly all of the streets have British names . . . . . Broad Street , Oistins , Liverpool lane , Welches , Buckingham Hill , etc etc.

    50 years of so called Independance , 1 step forward , 50 steps backwards.

    Enjoy Mr. Farrah , glad to have you in Barbados Sir.

    Reply
    • Jennifer October 25, 2017 at 3:10 pm

      The brain washing deep. The head bad and the whole body also. But all will be corrected and awakened in time.

      Reply
  16. Blanche Emsley October 25, 2017 at 1:16 pm

    My husband and I knew Roy and his lovely wife for years right up until she died. Roy still kept on coming back year after year. We haven’t been there since 2014,my husband has Dementia. We visited the Island for the first time in 1971 with our seven children. We visited as a family three times. We visited the Island nearly every year. During retirement we spent three Christmases on the Island.

    I have to say I preferred the times when your beautiful Island didn’t have so many vehicles, less buildings,etc. It is impossible to turn a small Island into “The Florida Keys”. The big condo buildings, for instance the one down in the Gap, that went up on the beach, which blocks their view of the sea. From the street
    It is an eyesore

    I understand completely why the Bajans resent tourists, they don’t benefit from it. The past Governemnts promised them the moon, so to speak. Like many politicians they are only there for their for there own gain.

    Roy Farrah knows Barbadians very well, his article was factual, and I am glad he spoke up. I don’t think that hard working Bajans get a fair shake.

    Reply
  17. F.A.Rudder October 25, 2017 at 1:31 pm

    A very well balanced and informative essay. It is indeed a great pleasure in having you for these past thirty years or more. I wish all the best of Barbados for you in your comming years. I would hope that you are able to absorb some of the Eastern coastal areas as they are tranquel bay sides and Atlantic seenary all exposed for one’s delight.

    Reply
  18. Donild Trimp October 25, 2017 at 1:49 pm

    @F.A.Rudder
    I will send the million off to you.

    You really believe this man had a dip in the filthy sea with all the sewage in it and all he had to do was hold his breath until it (the stench) dissipated?

    Reply
  19. Harry October 25, 2017 at 2:54 pm

    @DT sad sad.

    Reply
  20. bobo October 25, 2017 at 3:39 pm

    Thank you Mr Farrar-my Name is Bobo I will be in Barbados next month November 30th please have lunch with me -you can get my email from Barbados Today — please forgive the ignorant comments— ”as you and I know” it takes all sorts to make this unique universe . Thank you for your kindness– VIVA Barbados

    Reply
  21. MIIB October 25, 2017 at 3:46 pm

    You will get no forward with your racist red neck chauvinistic comments directed at us a people in comparison to those of the British in relation to our reported press whether your purple or baby blue.Kings and queens? Only recently them introduce Bussa in our curriculum as we have our own national heroes that resisted thier imperialism with such a ferocity that they continue to cover up, next time before you choose to air your mouth against us as a people do it front someone’s face not hiding behind fibre optic with fake pseudonyms and avatars.

    Read the barbados slave code and know we were the first in bondage in Caricom the experiment and you expect different with generations upon generations believing in massa and his fairytales? Don’t do that ossimore…think for yourself and education is no longer reserved for the privilege and rich.

    Reply
    • Jennifer October 25, 2017 at 4:38 pm

      Over the centuries all nations have spoiled this people aided by these so called black leaders who keep feeding themselves wide and full and making our yoke more tight. While the people stay on the ranting corn beef train. I am not worried at all about our future. When this system done “educate” you , please ensure that you and your children get the real education and seek to the house of your fathers. Darkness coming.

      Reply
  22. bobo October 25, 2017 at 3:52 pm

    Thank you Mr Farrar-my Name is Bobo I will be in Barbados next month November 30th please have lunch with me -you can get my email from Barbados Today — please forgive the ignorant comments— ”as you and I know” it takes all sorts to make this unique universe . Thank you for your kindness– VIVA Barbados —

    — I will get contact him– sorry for the inconvenience

    Reply
  23. BobotheCLowns October 25, 2017 at 5:56 pm

    This gentleman knows a good thing.Just wish more of our own would appreciate what they have been blessed with.As bajan that has lived abroad for many years, I just can’t wait to be back annually. Barbados is not as safe as before ,but it is much safer than many of our fellow Islands .It would be hoped that Mr.Farrars’s story would be seen and remind Bajans living abroad who would for reasons unknown have not returned to the Island in many moons that their lives might be extended with some regular bajan Sea Baths

    Reply
  24. Breadfruit. October 26, 2017 at 12:18 am

    @Donald Trimp

    #1 in the #2 business was a septic truck. the man is talking about holding his breath when they were pumping out the septic tank (not no dip in no sea).

    Reply
  25. Ossie Moore October 26, 2017 at 1:59 pm

    MIIB!! Bussa was only following the Irish who preceded his ideas. Now what is that for skin pigmentation? Thought you were more informed that what you display. Is it being uninformed, lack of research, under-educated or just plain old being illiterate? As a matter of fact it was only the rich who got educated in historical times, the were the one who read and wrote and during the course of time Religious orders taught those blacks and other races to read and write in our numeral and alphabetical system. Had it not for the Educated during the fifteenth century you and I hay still have been counting beads and drawing in the sand or mud. Don’t you think that’s a big achievement? You seem to be in a backward slip clean up your yard so you would not loose your balance on a banana peel. Have a great stay cation my friend!

    Reply
  26. Donild Trimp October 27, 2017 at 10:23 am

    @ Breadfruit –
    What do you take the following statement to mean? “Sometimes you dreaded going into the sea because it is filthy”

    I find this man’s story to be condescending, don’t you?

    Study the following statements from this man.
    1: “you’re a Bajan, where’s your citizenship?’” he quipped, adding that “it wouldn’t be a bad idea [except that] it takes two three, days to get it, and then another three four weeks before it is approved.”

    2: the “tourist board seems to be locked into itself rather than looking outside” and that it “looks inward, rather than out”.

    3: “It is not cheap and it is not easy” [to come here]

    4: “Most of the tourists who come spend eight to ten hours, and some of them 24 hours to get here, but when they get here they are not always welcome”.

    5: “In recent months Worthings Beach has become synonymous with all manner of sewage problems”

    6: “the people are not as friendly as they once were and that the island had undergone some negative changes over the past 30 years”

    7: “The warmth is still there, but it takes a lot of delving to get it out of the people these days”

    8: “—– roadside is “hell” because of the noise”

    9: “It is more or less a race track. It is certainly a race track for the Number 11s . . .It is a ZR racetrack from Oistins to Bridgetown”

    10: “Cutting in, cutting out and cutting other cars from half past five in the morning, it is ZRs and from two, three o’clock in the morning, you get the motor bikes or the race cars and they sit at the lights at the bottom of Rendezvous and they race down toward Rockley and I mean screaming”

    11: “You have got the older gears, so it starts crackling. It is like gunfire.”

    12: “Sometimes you dreaded going into the sea because it is filthy, but you give it a couple of days and it is fine. I don’t know why they thought this year was different to any other”

    13: “It used to be number one in the number two business, but all you did is just held your breath until it passed”

    Mr. Breadfruit, why are you fawning over this man’s story?

    Reply

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