Flood warning in effect

The Barbados Meteorological Services (BMS) issued a flood warning and small craft warning for the island at 6 a.m. today.

The BMS said the combination of a trough system and the ITCZ has been generating pockets of moderate to heavy showers and isolated thunderstorms across Barbados during the early morning hours.

Fluctuations in the intensity of the showers, scattered thunderstorms along with occasional gusty winds are expected to persist for at least the next 24 to 48 hours. Rainfall accumulations of two to four inches (50 to 100 mm) with isolated higher amounts are possible across the island as these systems linger over the area into early Wednesday.

The warnings will remain in effect until further notice.

Residents in flood-prone areas should remain on the alert and take the necessary precautions.

A flood warning means that flooding is already occurring or is imminent.

A small-craft warning means in this case that seas equal to or greater than 3m (10ft) and wind speeds of 20 to 25 knots (23 to 29 mph) will be affecting the marine area.

3 Responses to Flood warning in effect

  1. Kim Connell
    Kim Connell October 14, 2017 at 9:57 am

    Be careful every one

    Reply
  2. F.A.Rudder October 14, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    With good foresight lets remember one major item of importance. Conserving some of that rain fall for a dry day can be a very wise decision. We realy don’t know what to expect during our Christmas week, so be precautioned to take action. We would all like to see our flowergardens and kitchen gardens look as though they took their veggies.

    Reply
  3. Belfast October 15, 2017 at 5:05 pm

    For the past few weeks, there has been a blitz in the media concerning the indiscriminate dumping of coconut shell and the tardiness of vendors to remove shells from the various places of sales.
    The government itself should be ashamed to allow its Drainage and MTW crews who weed the sides of the roads to allow weeded stuff to remain on the side of the road all weekend long and more, to be washed down into the drains and wells, adding to the chronic flooding problems in many areas.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *