Higher tuition

UWI fees going up from next semester

Students at the Cave Hill campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI) will have to dig deeper into their pockets to pay for their education come September.

In a release issued Wednesday the university said a decision was taken by the UWI Council at its annual business meeting held at the campus last Thursday to increase the annual amount paid by students in tuition fees.

The decision, which takes effect at the start of the 2017/2018 academic year, is said to be “in accordance with its previous commitments to attain a cost recovery ratio not exceeding 20 per cent of total economic costs on all three campuses”.

However, UWI said the present cost recovery ratio at Cave Hill was approximately 17.9 per cent.

“Accordingly, fees at the Cave Hill campus in Barbados, which have remained unchanged for the past six years, will undergo a marginal increase in the academic year 2017/18. Tuition fees in the faculties of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education, and Science and Technology will move from $5,625 to $6,000, an increase of 6.67 per cent. Tuition fees in the Faculty of Law will move from $8,808 to $9,000 –– an increase of 2.18 per cent –– while fees within the Faculty of Medical Sciences remain unchanged,” the statement explained.

The changes also affect graduate programmes financed by University Grants Committee (UGC). However, fees for the taught masters programmes remain unchanged, UWI said.

The move comes as a further blow for students who were affected by a major shift in education policy by the Freundel Stuart administration, which stopped meeting the tuition costs for Barbadian students back in 2013.

Since then Cave Hill has reported a dramatic fall off in the number of students pursuing graduate and undergraduate studies, which had earlier prompted Principal Eudine Barriteau to make an urgent appeal to Government back in 2015 to re-examine its tuition fee policy.

“At the beginning of the 2013 academic year, the total enrolment at the Campus was 8,711 of which there were 1,285 graduate students and 7,426 undergraduate students enrolled. At this same time . . . when the policy was first introduced the enrolment of the Campus stood at a grand total of 6,936, of which there were 1102 graduate students and 5, 834 undergraduates,” Barriteau had said at the time.

Since then the campus has published in its 2015/16 annual report, further detailing the precipitous fall in its enrolment which has plummeted even further to 6,065 in academic year 2015/16 to 5,507 in 2016/17.

The decline in enrolment has been blamed on the 2013 budget announcement by Minister of Finance Chris Sinckler of the policy shift which effectively reduced the subventions to UWI by an estimated $42 million a year.

Following that announcement, the Guild of Students had also appealed directly to Government to reconsider the policy, predicting that it would have a significant effect on the campus’ enrolment.

However, Government has stuck with its decision, announcing instead that an estimated 3,000 bursaries would be provided to help students attend the tertiary institution.

Though cognizant of the “severe challenge” already being faced by students in meeting their financial obligations, UWI Wednesday suggested that its hands were tied in the matter.

In fact, the campus revealed that the increases could have been much more onerous, but that the 43 per cent across-the-board hike in tuition fees which had been recommended was rejected out of hand by its administration.

The campus also suggested that the approved changes have already received the blessing of the Guild of Students, as it urged the general student body to take advantage of all available funding opportunities, including scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance.

8 Responses to Higher tuition

  1. Angus Benn
    Angus Benn May 4, 2017 at 2:06 am

    If these ministers love this country as how they say. The ten percent that they take back recently,should of gone towards the University . A lot of these ministers think that every person in this country foolish. Two things you don’t mess with, Health and Education.These men forget where they came from. A lot of people been hurt. But a lot of them to shame to talk.

    Reply
    • Sunshine Sunny Shine May 4, 2017 at 5:14 am

      They do not love their island, they love money more. For the love of country and everything that is dear to Barbados, how coiuld any bajan support these shytes.

      Reply
  2. Ras Small
    Ras Small May 4, 2017 at 6:28 am

    Happy 50th!

    Reply
  3. Mack May 4, 2017 at 8:36 am

    Why can these highly paid university officials take a pay cut to help out with the situation. If they are so dedicated to higher education for our young people. All of them know the young people can’t afford what they ar charging now and here they are proposing an increase. These people are all for themselves.

    Reply
  4. jennifer May 4, 2017 at 12:19 pm

    THEIR LORDS have appointed them to be thorns in the sides and pricks in the eyes of their own people. To have this people continually FEEDING on THEIR monopolised garbage.

    Reply
    • Jennifer May 4, 2017 at 11:39 pm

      Now that you all have produced enough of those slave occupations you all want to rake in the millions off your own people. Cap off the number who wants to study and work for the same oppressor by making it in-affordable. THEY no longer need the manpower in BULK anymore. All of you lot of educated big heads is nothing more than suckers for the same poisonous SAP.

      Reply
  5. Milli Watt May 4, 2017 at 3:16 pm

    this campus has to come clean about how it spends the money. until that happens good money after bad…………..what a waste

    Reply
  6. Milli Watt May 4, 2017 at 3:25 pm

    I wonder how much the Principal does make a month……..let me see add the 4 multiply by 6 find the second differential, integrate to establish the root and apply the polynomial matrix with exponentially seeking convergent logarithms to determine……………..it looks like a LOT.

    Reply

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