Industrial unrest at LIAT

The management of LIAT said they are experiencing several flight delays and cancellations due to industrial unrest.

In a brief statement today, acting Chief Executive Officer Julie Reifer-Jones said these current irregular operations may continue to occur over the next few days as the carrier works towards resolving the issues.

She apologized to travellers for any disruption to their travel plans.

“We remain committed to working with our employees to resolve the issues impacting the delivery of our services to the Caribbean,” Reifer-Jones said.

Unions representing LIAT employees had earlier threatened to take action if LIAT goes ahead with plans to pay salaries late.

The unions have also argued that in 2014 they participated in a salary deferral exercise, which was projected for five months, but lasted 14 months, without any tangible results.

Reifer-Jones said she sent a letter to the Chairman of the shareholder governments, Prime Minister Dr Ralph Gonsalves of St Vincent and the Grenadines, asking him to urgently intervene.

She has confirmed that the shareholder governments have agreed to intervene in the dispute.

Reifer-Jones said the leaders have agreed to a meeting, which is to be held next week in Barbados.

 

22 Responses to Industrial unrest at LIAT

  1. Chevi Cato
    Chevi Cato April 2, 2017 at 3:13 pm

    I don’t want to laugh to hard.

    Reply
  2. Marsha Hinds
    Marsha Hinds April 2, 2017 at 3:33 pm

    Takes until next week to convene an urgent meeting??

    If that does not say all bout my Caribbean…

    Reply
  3. Susanna Ophelia
    Susanna Ophelia April 2, 2017 at 3:42 pm

    Lord I just Bragg of the magnificent job you guys were doing

    Reply
  4. Joey St
    Joey St April 2, 2017 at 3:45 pm

    Why not close down the airline and start fresh?

    Reply
  5. Dennis Taitt
    Dennis Taitt April 2, 2017 at 3:57 pm

    Liat too expensive.

    Reply
  6. Blessings April 2, 2017 at 4:07 pm

    Well well, what connundrum. I m travelling soon hope I won’t have to experience this problem. Lord u r in control.

    Reply
  7. G.G Billingy
    G.G Billingy April 2, 2017 at 4:24 pm

    Conflict Resolution continues to be a major headache for LIAT. Why Julie Reifer-Jones never requested the urgent meeting weeks ago when the union signaled that the Salary issues will be resisted? LIAT management always gets paid when ever there is industrial unrest. The Airline losses $$$$, those who strike may not get paid and travelers get frustration & headaches. LIAT management never seems to loose anything.

    Reply
  8. BimJim April 2, 2017 at 7:52 pm

    With a background in hotel accounting, Reifer-Jones is barely qualified (IF in fact she is) to be CFO of an airline. But I am taking bets that the shareholders of LIAT will AGAIN give a person unqualified and incpompetent to be CEO of ANY airline a shove and tell them “Go, looka see whuh you could do, nah?” yet again.

    LIAT has been screwed over time and time again – for decades – by incompetence, stupidity and sheer unadulterated politics. From the chairman of the shareholders down to the top executives nobody is – or ever has been – truly qualified to make intelligent decisions about ANY airline, yet here we are – a year after the last fool resigned – and still no CEO appointment.

    The oversight of LIAT ** CAN NOT BE SERIOUS ** about whether LIAT lives or dies, OR about the hundreds of millions – perhaps BILLIONS – of taxpayer dollars already poured into the airline.

    LIAT ** REQUIRES ** professional oversight and management, an airline IS NOT A HARDWARE STORE.

    We have competent current and former aviation people all around the EC who know what they are talking about. WHY are they being ignored for Board positions?

    WHY is one bricks-and-mortar businessman after another being co-opted onto LIAT’s Board when it is CLEAR that they have NO CLUE about airlines?

    As one with 45 years of Caribbean aviation experience let me warn you, if you thought aviation was expensive now, wait until you have to take a charter where you want to go because LIAT no longer exists – or because Caribbean Airlines is the only remaining player ($$$$$).

    Don’t laugh… that exact scenario is just around the corner, take it from me.

    Reply
  9. Jim Lynch
    Jim Lynch April 2, 2017 at 8:00 pm

    With a background in hotel accounting, Reifer-Jones is barely qualified (IF in fact she is) to be CFO of an airline. But I am taking bets that the shareholders of LIAT will AGAIN give a person unqualified and incompetent to be CEO of ANY airline a shove and tell them “Go, looka see whuh you could do, nah?” yet again.

    LIAT has been screwed over time and time again – for decades – by incompetence, stupidity and sheer unadulterated politics. From the chairman of the shareholders down to the top executives nobody is – or ever has been – truly qualified to make intelligent decisions about ANY airline, yet here we are – a year after the last fool resigned – and still no CEO appointment.

    The oversight of LIAT ** CAN NOT BE SERIOUS ** about whether LIAT lives or dies, OR about the hundreds of millions – perhaps BILLIONS – of taxpayer dollars already poured into the airline.

    LIAT ** REQUIRES ** professional oversight and management, an airline IS NOT A HARDWARE STORE.

    We have competent current and former aviation people all around the EC who know what they are talking about. WHY are they being ignored for Board positions?

    WHY is one bricks-and-mortar businessman after another being co-opted onto LIAT’s Board when it is CLEAR that they have NO CLUE about airlines?

    As one with 45 years of Caribbean aviation experience let me warn you, if you thought aviation was expensive now, wait until you have to take a charter where you want to go because LIAT no longer exists – or because Caribbean Airlines is the only remaining player ($$$$$).

    Don’t laugh… that exact scenario is just around the corner, take it from me.

    Reply
  10. Tony Webster April 2, 2017 at 8:19 pm

    Buying LIAT shares, whilst it was running huge losses, and Antigua had over 700 folks on payroll: seemed like a good idea at the time!! Cud try having the CAROM secretariat do a “study”, which in due course will be ” considered” at the next HOGS thing: and a sub-comittee of little HOGS would then report back at the earliest possible opportunity…..in 2018…. by which time elections somewhere will be underway, and evahbody so busy, that a “definite” decision would be taken in the “near future”. Meanwhile, to keep things flying through the air, Printing Presses here will roll, and out will come ….aviation Jet A1 stuff…by the plane-load.

    Chris…fasten your seatbelt… for take-off!

    Reply
  11. Jevan Jutagir
    Jevan Jutagir April 2, 2017 at 9:41 pm

    Mark Ammon Call me if you get problems

    Reply
  12. Jea Alleyne April 2, 2017 at 10:35 pm

    In every field and profession – Man Made Problems.

    Reply
  13. The Negrocrat April 3, 2017 at 5:08 am

    Tony, you are correct. Chris will employ the services ov the print master and Antigua will keep their army of occupation.

    Reply
  14. Alana B April 3, 2017 at 7:32 am

    The union representing LIAT’s workers need to understand that world’s economic uncertainty does not leave them exempt from having to implement with management something close to if not the ‘Scanlon Plan’. Trade Union leaders of the past like Sir Frank Walcott and others would have adopted similar remedies for such a crisis. Whilst unions seek after the interests of their members and management seeks to maintain profitability there must be some measure of compromise for the survival of the airline and jobs.

    The Scanlon Plan suggested back then that workers and the union needed to work together. The times was hard back then as it is now. Competition is fierce, profits are down, workers want increased wages and working conditions and the traditional adversarial relations cannot continue because everyone would lose.

    The union and LIAT needs to cooperate. Do not press for wage demands at this time. Improve your efficiency, increase productivity, try and reduce costs by limiting free travel to individuals who hold certain positions and decrease waste. LIAT would survive and employees would certainly realize increased wages.

    Reply
    • Shamu April 3, 2017 at 8:56 am

      Just looked at my $175 LIAT ticket, Base fare $72; Taxes $103. WOW – the govt. taxes etc are more than the base fare from LIAT. From $72, LIAT has to pay the staff and so on and yet maintain the good services. The govts. just collect the taxes without adding to the salaries of the staff and conditions at the airports.
      I agree with you, but it is the govts. who are milking the LIAT in one hand & then giving it back with the other while grunting. In the meanwhile all of us are being taken for a ride. Reminds me of the ‘tradewinds’ song “who to blame”.

      Reply
  15. Baz Moz
    Baz Moz April 3, 2017 at 7:43 am

    Delays !!! So what’s new

    Reply
  16. Collin Stephens April 3, 2017 at 8:34 am

    Why doesn’t LIAT lower it’s fares..I believe that would increase the volume of travellers on LIAT’s network..the governments interference(share holders) isn’t helping either. It’s more expensive to fly from Barbados to Dominica on LIAT than to fly from Barbados to New York.

    Reply
  17. Nathaniel Samuels April 3, 2017 at 9:50 am

    Those do not seem to know of Skype and all the other instant means of communication. Why does it have to take a week to convene a meeting, the substance of which could cause disruption to the region and its core money earner, tourism, if not addressed urgently? No wonder this region is in such a sorry state and especially with a leader like fumblestilskin!

    Reply
  18. Llig Nais April 3, 2017 at 9:59 am

    Barbados. There must be a different option to this madness that is the Caribbean regional airline this issue needs the participation of the people of Barbados. I for one see to withdraw our fidty one percent or sell it to an “unwilling” buyer.l

    Reply
  19. Tony Webster April 3, 2017 at 5:31 pm

    Yes, Lord….we ARE grateful dat crude is low nowadays, (Brent crude , as I write, $53.09 bbl.) and that we surely ought to be able to maintain “level flight”, at this low price.

    Yes, please doan sen’ it back up to $125 bbl. Yes, we are praying here in BIM, just as hard as we can, Lord.
    Amen.

    Reply
  20. Milli Watt April 3, 2017 at 8:44 pm

    ahhhhhhhhhh……at last I going get my money. well done!!!!

    Reply

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