Arawak Cement Company to build concrete roads

Arawak Cement Company is to begin work next month on a concrete road in a bid to convince Government to move away from asphalt to concrete surfaces.

General Manager Manuel Toro said the company would construct 200 to 300 metres of road leading to its Checker Hall, St Lucy plant.

“We expect to start building that road next month. It is going to be a pilot just to test the condition of the road, the life cycle of the road, the cost compared with the other alternatives, and then we will communicate that to the authorities and the Government to see that this is possible to do,” the cement company boss told Barbados TODAY.

Toro said Arawak Cement had discussed the subject with Minister of Transport and Works Michael Lashley, who offered to have the ministry work closely with the cement company on the project.

He said tenders would go out shortly inviting bids from local contractors, some of whom had been trained last year in Nicaragua and Panama at the facilities of Arawak’s new owner, CEMEX.

Engineers say concrete pavements are typically stronger, more durable and more environmentally friendly than asphalt roadways, and can also be grooved to provide durable skid-resistant surfaces.

However, they have a higher initial cost, and can be more time-consuming to construct, which is why countries prefer to use asphalt, the experts say.

However, Arawak Cement wants to push Barbados towards concrete, as part of the company’s strategy to expand its market share, Toro explained.

“We see a big opportunity there. I think if the plan is to bring more tourism . . . that tourism will need infrastructure, and adequate infrastructure,” he said.

Meanwhile, Toro revealed that the cement company had entered into cooperation agreements with the Samuel Jackman Prescod Polyclinic and the Barbados Community College to source fresh technical talent.

As part of the agreement, at least ten students studying to become mechanics, electricians and welders will receive six-month internship at the plant.

Toro also assured that there were no immediate plans to further restructure the local firm, which went through a successful voluntary separation package last year.

The new general manager renewed Arawak’s commitment to Barbados, saying the company had a bright future here.

“We want to contribute to that future. Not only generating employment and payment of taxes . . . also bringing in foreign exchange . . . . Now we want to expand our business lines because we believe that we have the technology to add to the local industry, especially in concrete and concrete grouts. That’s our target and we are thinking about that,” Toro declared. 

12 Responses to Arawak Cement Company to build concrete roads

  1. michael parker March 28, 2017 at 4:54 am

    concrete roads are more maintenance free compared to asphalt especially in hot countries like barbados, a prime example is a long stretch of the M6 motorway in northern england where the weather can be atrocious, rarely see any maintenance being carried out ie,(no potholes).

    Reply
  2. Angus Benn
    Angus Benn March 28, 2017 at 5:19 am

    Concrete road will destroy your tiers faster.

    Reply
  3. Frank White March 28, 2017 at 9:52 am

    If this is a way forward for Barbados new road infrastructure, I hope that minister Lashley, who I have no faith in whatsoever, would spread the wealth across the board where black owned businesses get a piece of this pie and not give cemex and baloney Maloney all the work and left it up to them to share with the black community…

    Reply
  4. Helicopter(8P) March 28, 2017 at 10:06 am

    The best good news I’ve gotten out of Bridgetown in a while! It’s good to see that Arawak Cement and Mr.Toro has given his support to the young men women of the Samuel Jackman-Prescot Polytechnic and the Barbados Community College. For the production of cement and concrete we need chemist, geologist, electrical technologist and mechanical engineers in the processing. The production, distribution and transportation will need Information technologist, clerical staff and security.

    Reply
  5. F.A.Rudder March 28, 2017 at 10:19 am

    It quite disturbing to see that some persons responding to serious environmental and national issues; just come on board this media outlet with non scientific and outlandish statements of which they haven’t the slightest clues. How can some one say concrete paved highways wear their tires faster? Sir for your future intelligence they are many formulated compounds of concrete and those that are used for road surface are formulated for rubber contact. Please research and know that chemist and geologist work side by side at cement factory labs to produce the best formulas.

    Reply
  6. Donild Trimp March 28, 2017 at 10:36 am

    Read the following statement and understand what it entails.

    “It is going to be a pilot just to test the condition of the road, the life cycle of the road”

    Reply
  7. tedd March 28, 2017 at 12:32 pm

    to the best of my internet research concrete roads do wear down rubber faster however they provide better grip and less skidding and thus accidents.

    a look at the roundabout in st patricks , ch ch , reveal that after 20 or more years of useit is in almost the same condition as when it was first constructed and no signs of needing any repairs in near futues. it must also be noted that roundabouts and corners come under the most strain and are most prone to having the surface damaged.

    the st patricks roundabout is a perfect example of money well spent. maybe we should look at concrete for roundabouts and those parts of the road that is most under stress.

    Reply
  8. The Wiz March 28, 2017 at 1:59 pm

    It really comes down to a proper life-cycle cost analysis. Concrete will have a higher initial cost with less maintenance compared to asphalt’s lower initial cost with more ongoing maintenance. The problem in Barbados is that we don’t maintain stuff. A dollar spent at the right time can avoid significant $ down the road.

    Reply
  9. jrsmith March 28, 2017 at 2:54 pm

    .I want to see the technology which is going to be used , new road infrastructure and no proper management ,still wouldn’t make any difference……..

    Reply
  10. Dr Randolph Bourne March 28, 2017 at 7:35 pm

    It’s a move in the right direction,spend more now and save much more later.

    Reply
  11. North Point March 29, 2017 at 12:31 am

    I hope that ‘HARD ROCK CEMENT ‘ is not left out of this trial project, if it were not for them , ARAWAK CEMENT’ would be killing we dead with prices, dem running bout like chickens wid dem heads off and bringing gifts, be careful, dem had cement at $26. per bag prior to ‘HARD ROCK’ coming into the market, all of a sudden they playing that they are so kind, go to hell, ‘HARD ROCK CEMENT ‘ all de way Mr. Lashley. de road dat dem want to pave did want paving fuh years, why now. Mr. Maloney come on the other side and start paving too.

    Reply
  12. Tony Waterman March 29, 2017 at 12:49 am

    @michael parker!!!!”concrete roads are

    more maintenance free compared to asphalt

    especially in hot countries like

    barbados, a prime example is a long

    stretch of the M6 motorway in northern

    england where the weather can be

    atrocious,”
    Michael!!!Since when was Northern England

    “Tropical”,why do you associate the two

    Obviously Different Regions??

    @ Angus Benn!!!” Concrete road will

    destroy your tires faster.” There is some

    Truth to That Statement, Irregardless of

    what F.A.Ruder is saying, that you have

    said is EXACTLY the Reason Why The

    Province of Quebec, Canada has Stopped

    laying anymore Concrete Roadways,

    Horrendous NOISE Pollution, and EXCESSIVE

    Tire Wear,Proven by the Tire

    Manufacturers, not by Hearsay.

    @Frank White!!!! How can The Minister

    Spread the wealth across the board where

    black owned businesses get a piece of

    this pie and not give cemex and baloney

    Maloney all the work and left it up to

    them to share with the black community??
    How Many “BLACK” Concrete Producers are

    you aware of In Barbados ???

    @Helicopter(8P)!!! They are Obviously

    Smart Business Persons, they are

    investing in their Business, by Investing

    in these Students.

    @News Report!!!”General Manager Manuel

    Toro said the company would construct 200

    to 300 metres of road leading to its

    Checker Hall, St Lucy plant.” Is this

    Really a Busy enough section of Roadway

    to be used as a Test area ???

    @tedd!!! “to the best of my internet

    research concrete roads do wear down

    rubber faster however they provide better

    grip and less skidding and thus

    accidents.”
    More Grip does result in Faster Tire

    Wear, I Spent 22.5 Years in the Tire

    Business, and was Trained by Goodyear

    Tire & Rubber Co. Sherbrooke Quebec, and

    Bridgestone Tire Canada.

    @The Wiz!!!”Concrete will have a higher

    initial cost with less maintenance

    compared to asphalt’s lower initial cost

    with more ongoing maintenance.” Yes There

    is some truth to that Statement, but, You

    and everyone else involved by Commenting,

    in my OPINION are missing the REAL

    problem with Road Construction in

    Barbados Over the Years.
    We used to have Roads that lasted for

    eons, because they were built for LIGHTER

    Vehicles, Albion Buses, Mercedes Busses,

    Bedford Trucks, Austin Busses and Trucks

    etc etc, our Roading Building Technology

    has Not evoled with the Advent of USA<

    CANADIAN and European Style BIG RIG

    TRACTOR TRAILERS, which are Ten times the

    WEIGHT of a Bedford LORRY, atbthe Same

    time we Continue to use CORAL STONE MARL

    as a Bed for Laying 2" of ASPHALT onto,

    and the EXCESSIVE Weight of these NEW

    Heavy Duty TrUCKS/LORRIES are Taking a

    Toll on these Roads.
    Concrete For all we know "MIGHT" Solve

    "SOME" of our Road problems, but if

    "CORAL STONE MARL" is used as the BASE

    for Laying down that COncrete onto, These

    Concrete Roadways will last not that much

    Longer that the Asphalt Roads.

    Check with whmomsoever Laid down the

    Runways at GAIA and find out what was

    used as a base for the Topping there,

    there are litterally Thousands of Take

    offs and Landingd there Every

    DAY,WEEK,MONTH,YEAR, and how Many "POT

    HOLES" are they on the Tarmac at ANY

    Given Time.

    Can anyone find out and let US know???

    Another Problem which the proponents of

    CONCRETE has NOT Mentioned, is the Fact

    That since NBarbados is SURROUNDED by the

    Sea (SALT) Salt Residue Permiates the

    Air, and is Brought to the Ground by

    Rainfall, So!! REBAR has to be used to

    Stabalise the Road, and i am hoping that

    the Poweres that be at Arawak Cement

    Company, are aware that they CANNOT use

    Ordinary REBAR in the Construction of

    these Concrete Roadways, and that there

    is a Special COATED REBAR that MUST be

    used for this Specific Purpose.

    It is By Law Illegal in Canada to ue

    anything but COATED REBAR in Bridges or

    JERSEY BARRIERS or any type Construction

    that Pertains to Roadways.

    If anyone wants to see what happens in

    Barbados with Concrete where Regular

    REBAR is used, look at any House that

    have those decorative pieces in their

    Varandas, and in the Case of some Houses

    in Gemswick St. Phillip where all the

    Concrete used in the Houses is Cracking

    open because the REBAR is Rotting Inside

    the Concrete and Spreading out causing

    the Concrete to CRACK.

    Having CONCRETE ROADS in Barbados WILL

    have it's Problems, it will NOT be an END

    ALL.It has to be 100% Right.it also Has

    to be done for the RIGHT Reasons.

    Reply

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