Camouflage pants costs man $150

A 41-year-old man must pay the District ‘A’ Magistrates’ Court $150 in two weeks if he wants to maintain a clean criminal record.

When Emerson Delbert Victor of Jordan’s Land, Workmans, St George went before Magistrate Kristie Cuffy-Sargeant this week, he admitted to wearing camouflage clothing, in contravention of the law.

According to prosecutor Sergeant Janice Ifill, lawmen were on patrol along Swan Street, The City when they observed Victor wearing pants made out of the material used for the military.

He was approached by police and spoken to. However, he behaved in an aggressive manner and refused to give his name to police and was subsequently taken into custody.

Victor told the magistrate: “I was not aware it was disruptive material. When the officers explained to me, I became aware. It was not my intention to be disrespectful.”

He was then ordered to pay the money and told if he fails to pay up, he will spend two weeks in jail.

26 Responses to Camouflage pants costs man $150

  1. Jay Manny
    Jay Manny February 25, 2017 at 9:51 am

    Courts and police have nothing better to do?

    Reply
    • Joel C. Payne
      Joel C. Payne February 25, 2017 at 10:10 am

      I guess you don’t recall when people used to get pulled over in the other islands and robbed at gun point because a fake military uniformed officer stopped them on the road. Still happens in Africa all the time.

      Reply
    • Jay Manny
      Jay Manny February 25, 2017 at 10:14 am

      With or without people still getting rob, and if criminals want to put on fake military uniforms this law can do nothing to stop it.

      Reply
    • Shana Vanderwolf
      Shana Vanderwolf February 25, 2017 at 10:31 am

      And that is why the police and the court is nipping it in the bud!

      Reply
    • Elroy Doyle
      Elroy Doyle February 25, 2017 at 11:00 am

      Nipping what in the bud exactly? I have a ton of camouflage gear that I can wear anywhere here in Bermuda. From the law courts to the police station, any hotel, golf course or school yard. I just have to remember not to pack any when I’m making the trip home to Bim. Ridiculous that in 2016 Barbados still have this nuisance law.

      Reply
    • Kathyann Best
      Kathyann Best February 25, 2017 at 11:12 am

      If it is the law of the land, obey it!

      Reply
    • Joel C. Payne
      Joel C. Payne February 25, 2017 at 11:14 am

      Jay Manny It makes it harder because the uniforms aren’t floating around all the time.

      Reply
    • Jay Manny
      Jay Manny February 25, 2017 at 11:18 am

      Because it is law doesn’t make it right. Remember slavery was law

      Reply
      • Celly February 26, 2017 at 7:45 am

        Are you seriously making a reference to wearing camouflage clothing and slavery???

        Reply
    • Joel C. Payne
      Joel C. Payne February 25, 2017 at 11:18 am

      Elroy Doyle I wouldn’t boast that. This is no big deal. Dress up in a police officer uniform in Bermuda and see what happens if they don’t care about camo. OR try to put the police car style lights on your civilian vehicle. That’s what the big countries ream you all about still.

      Reply
    • Elroy Doyle
      Elroy Doyle February 25, 2017 at 11:24 am

      A police uniform is not a fashion statement as far as I know, too much stigma attached to it. And I think more crime is committed by people in priests uniform/dress than anything else.

      Reply
  2. Boyce Jr Angus
    Boyce Jr Angus February 25, 2017 at 10:04 am

    Smfh……….

    Reply
  3. Hewers of wood February 25, 2017 at 10:06 am

    This is disgusting. Utterly.

    Reply
  4. Cyprian Greaves
    Cyprian Greaves February 25, 2017 at 10:59 am

    What a stupid ass law! why the so called police don’t go look for the guns that could really hurt them instead of looking for what ppl wearing.

    Reply
  5. Dennis Taitt
    Dennis Taitt February 25, 2017 at 11:16 am

    Nonsense. Get the guns off the streets. And stop playing with your cel phones when people come in the station to file a report.

    Reply
  6. Jai Khan
    Jai Khan February 25, 2017 at 11:23 am

    I have no problem with the law being upheld, but I’m sure that young man did not make the fabric or the pants he was wearing. Why aren’t they also pursuing those who openly offer these items for sale? The next thing I expect to see offered for sale is a used police uniform… Don’t just target the leaves find the root… Come on now!!!

    Reply
  7. John Wick
    John Wick February 25, 2017 at 11:26 am

    Nonsense this is stupid and i see the police was bored

    Reply
  8. feedup February 25, 2017 at 11:56 am

    So much stupid laws dat is not helping in anyway. Ppl are being rod, shoot at or kill in broad day light without even wearing a mask, do you need camouflage to rob? . I had a flowered surf pants and was stop by the police and was told camouflage is not only the color but also the pattern. Wat a surf pants have to do with the army.

    Reply
  9. Muhammad Hasan
    Muhammad Hasan February 25, 2017 at 12:13 pm

    Sigh’…

    Reply
  10. G Jemmott February 25, 2017 at 1:52 pm

    It amazes me that bajans leave Barbados and forget there are laws of the land that differ from other countries. This law was in effect for years. Jay Manny when was slavery a law? Slavery was forced labor. It seems that what ever the Police does is a problem.

    Reply
  11. JOHN TITHERIDGE February 25, 2017 at 4:10 pm

    I don’t know why people want to wear camo stuff anyway?

    Reply
  12. M king February 25, 2017 at 8:49 pm

    Camoflage pants really! Come on Barbados. What next navy blue pants. How about grey shirts. Why not go after gun runners and drug importers. That may be hard work.

    Reply
  13. Rhaj Paul February 26, 2017 at 1:05 pm

    Wearing camo garments in a casual or fashionable manner is obviously different from dressing like a soldier. This army / government / lawyers did not create nor patent any camouflage patterns, not even the one they currently use. Yet it behaves like if it owns them all, but that’s only because we allow them to do so, perhaps because they are intimidating and because we don’t know how to change or modify any laws as citizenry.

    Nevertheless, a law against military impersonation is sufficient. Going beyond that is unnecessary and frankly stupid in 2016 where camouflage patterns are used globally or anything from a house lamp to a Benz car, wedding dresses to dog sweaters, rolling papers to eyewear frames.

    It’s infuriating to think that instead of being encouraged to contribute to the creation of camouflage patterns (nature-based design) for the whole world to enjoy and consume, we would malign, belittle and chastise islanders for using these patterns, who aren’t using them in any nefarious way.

    But that’s us…

    Too smart for our own good, and too retarded to move forward.

    The continuance of this policy against casual and fashion camo usage a decade and a half into a whole new era is disdainful to say the least. We should be embarrassed, but our pride probably won’t even let us… sigh.

    Reply
  14. Andre'a February 26, 2017 at 1:26 pm

    In this in age they still stressing about camouflage and ppl dying everyday by guns. Isn’t that a more pressing matter that needs to be handle!!! Come on already PRIORITIES… SMH

    Reply
  15. Concerned Citizen February 26, 2017 at 4:01 pm

    The military wears other colours as well, why arent those banned too, we pick up a law from another land and noone understands how it will impact us… noone in barbados wants to pose as a fake soldier… people out there in fake flow uniform and bwa uniforms and light and power uniforms….. let ban people from wearing green shirts red shirts and blue shirt too….

    Reply
  16. Othneal February 27, 2017 at 6:05 pm

    Well said Than Paul. There is a saying “The law is an associate”.Here we have a prime example that speaks volumes about the intelligence or lack of it, of the persons who conceived a bad piece of legislation. Most civilized countries have a law against impersonating an officer of the law. This gentleman was simply exercising the rights of citizens of a free country. That of a free man to express his individuality. Here is where we can make a comparison with slavery. This law is oppressive. Slavery was ultimately oppressive. Both deny individuality, respect and freedom. Unfortunately that is an unintended consequences of bad legislation, born out of a lack of wisdom and intellectual tardiness. A bad piece of legislation that must rescinded.

    Reply

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