Bajan jailed for 16 years in UK

A Barbadian drug smuggler has been jailed for 16 years for bringing £2million-worth (overBDS$5 million) of pink liquid cocaine into the UK last July.

Errol Watson, age 54, from Wanstead in East London was arrested after Border Force officers at Gatwick examined a consignment labelled as oil filters, which had been shipped from Barbados.
Cylinders inside the filters were x-rayed (see below), revealing a suspect substance inside.

When officers drilled into the cylinders a bright pink liquid came out. It tested positive for cocaine.
Acting quickly so as not to alert the crime group responsible, NCA investigators took the cylinders to a specialist laboratory where all the liquid was removed, yielding around 26 kilos of the drug, with a potential value once adulterated and sold on the streets of up to £2 million.
The cylinders were then refilled with sand and continued on their journey to Wanstead.
NCA officers listened in as Watson took delivery of the cylinders and attempted to get inside them. When he realized the drugs were missing Watson phoned a contact in the Caribbean to complain, telling them: “Somebody opened this thing and put something in it . . . this thing empty . . . I’m telling you . . .”. Shortly after officers arrested him.
In coordinated activity, detectives from the Royal Barbados Police moved in simultaneously on two addresses in Barbados where they arrested Watson’s brother. They also nabbed another quantity of pink liquid cocaine. A number of other cylinders were recovered at the other premises.
Records seized in the two raids showed that Watson had been involved in a number of other previous shipments using several different aliases as cover.
In some cases cylinders had been recycled, and sent back to Barbados empty to be used again.
Last week Monday, Watson pleaded guilty to conspiring to import cocaine on what should have been day one of his trial at the Old Bailey.
He was jailed for 16 years on Wednesday, January 18.
His brother had previously been convicted in Barbados of cocaine possession.
Steve McIntyre, from the National Crime Agency’s Border Policing Command in the UK, said:
“Drug trafficking is a crime that has great impacts, from exploitation in South American source countries to violence and gun crime on the streets of London. I have no doubt that Errol Watson had been involved in this type of criminality for years.
“This was certainly an unusual method of smuggling cocaine, the first time we have seen it in brightly coloured pink liquid like this.
“It was also a very deep concealment, demonstrating that the organised crime groups we are combating have access to sophisticated equipment and expertise.
“Working with our law enforcement colleagues in Border Force and overseas we are determined to do all we can to disrupt and bring to justice the criminal networks involved in international drug smuggling.”
Laura Tams, Specialist Prosecutor from the Organised Crime Division, said:
“Errol Watson was at the heart of a sophisticated and organized conspiracy to import cocaine into the UK from the Caribbean.
“Through collaborative working between prosecutors, the National Crime Agency, Border Force and the authorities in Barbados, he has been brought to justice.”
 (The National Crime Agency)

27 Responses to Bajan jailed for 16 years in UK

  1. Harry January 24, 2017 at 7:30 am

    Excellent Police work, an example for local Police………

    Reply
    • Wayne August 13, 2017 at 11:38 am

      The RBPF did their job too, this was a combined effort, arrests was made on both sides of the pond

      Reply
  2. Peter January 24, 2017 at 7:57 am

    I know that in certain countries he would have been sentenced to DEATH! And deservedly so.

    Reply
    • Richard Johnston January 24, 2017 at 8:25 am

      A death penalty would serve no useful purpose other than satisfying blood lust. No civilized country has a death penalty on the books.

      Reply
      • Peter January 24, 2017 at 9:22 am

        Richard. You are so civilized. Why don’t you try smuggling in some drugs into Singapore or Malaysia or Saudi Arabia or any such country where the death penalty is strongly imposed. America has the death penalty. Are they uncivilized too? Well we part ways here because I believe in the death penalty.

        Reply
        • Richard Johnston January 24, 2017 at 10:53 am

          Do you feel it’s appropriate to emulate Saudi Arabia and Malaysia? I don’t.
          Thirty-one American states impose the death penalty and that is barbaric, although there is a moratorium in 4 of them, and the practice is declining.
          The death penalty is not a deterrent, it merely satisfies a blood lust.

          Reply
        • Wayne August 13, 2017 at 11:49 am

          Peter, in some of the countries that you mentioned, alcohol is classified as the same, I’ve heard stories of merchant seamen ent r ring those countries with liquor and trading it as contraband, one man’s sweets is another man’s bitters

          Reply
      • Carson C Cadogan January 24, 2017 at 9:23 am

        So true.

        Reply
  3. Peter January 24, 2017 at 9:30 am

    The Britich authorities made a clever move. They watched him clrar the drugs then followed him. Of course they secretly verified that there was drugs in whatever form. These smugglers are very smart too. they have special plants following them to see if they are being followed by intelligence. Some of them actually exchange bags which looks identical to theirs. and the police end up following them only to find no drugs. The exchange was already made. hence the use of tracking devices being deployed.

    Reply
    • Richard Johnston January 24, 2017 at 10:54 am

      You seem to know a lot about how drug smuggling operates.

      Reply
  4. Alex Alleyne January 24, 2017 at 10:08 am

    You are a disgrace to Barbados, I hope your time is spent mopping floors from dusk till dawn .

    Reply
  5. Kevin January 24, 2017 at 11:04 am

    Its people like him that will have us Bajans having to get a visa to travel to the UK.

    Reply
  6. Peter January 24, 2017 at 12:20 pm

    Richard, Let’s say I’m well connected with intelligencia and their mode of investigations and operations. I know quite a number of people who think like you. They’re all self admitted faggots. Perhaps.Just perhaps.

    Reply
    • Richard Johnston January 24, 2017 at 6:24 pm

      That language is unacceptable in polite society. I am using my full real name, are you?

      Reply
  7. Helicopter(8P) January 24, 2017 at 12:30 pm

    Be careful Mr Johnston you may not know how individuals get information they may be or may have been in the intel circuit. I do not believe there are any persons more informed on drug smuggling than Special Operations Military police. The local police drug squads have to have enough positive info before special operations equipment is dropped.

    Reply
    • Richard Johnston January 24, 2017 at 6:25 pm

      What’s your point?

      Reply
  8. kathy-Ann Clarke January 24, 2017 at 1:54 pm

    Errol Watson, this is a total disgrace. Judging from what I have read, you are a pro at this kind of thing, but ,it finally came to an end. And I hope your time spent behind bars, you will reflect on what you have done, and you will ask for forgiveness and look to clean up your life.

    Reply
  9. Donild Trimp January 24, 2017 at 2:01 pm

    No surprise.

    Mr.Watson was known as a drug dealer for a long time.

    Reply
  10. seagul January 24, 2017 at 2:27 pm

    ‘Let’s say I’m well connected with intelligencia and their mode of investigations and operations’, blah, blah. …let’s just say you come off like an informal faggot….in other words you may be a drug smuggling snitch.

    Reply
    • Peter January 24, 2017 at 8:26 pm

      seagull, You’re way out of my league. I would not waste my time arguing with you. You are bait. Be careful.

      Reply
  11. M January 24, 2017 at 3:47 pm

    we all know they are the fall guys. no cocaine is produced in the caribbean….. come on now..

    Reply
  12. Alex 3 January 24, 2017 at 5:39 pm

    Death penalties are so yesterday. I personally prefer isolation and hard labour for life.

    Reply
  13. Samantha Best January 24, 2017 at 6:06 pm

    Just hope that when the call was made to Barbados that the local police were able to identify the source. Look how quick his case concluded. Serious about fighting crime there!!

    Reply
  14. Brewster January 24, 2017 at 6:14 pm

    He was tooo brave to go to UK with that. 16 years!! The Brits do not joke when sentencing. Who will be the next arse to try and smuggle again? Stupse

    Reply
  15. Hal Austin January 24, 2017 at 6:29 pm

    Richard,
    Bajans like ‘popping a few necks’; if necessary they will volunteer to do it for nothing. They like punishing people for assumed wrongs..
    It is a psychology deeply rooted in slavery. Just look at the magistrates’ courts.
    Why do yo think we got rid of the privy council?

    Reply
  16. George Downes January 25, 2017 at 9:08 pm

    all of the countries that dont have the death penalty, has overcrowding jailes and a ridiculous annual budget to shell out for the upkeep of those greedy, violent, dope/death dealing dogs. that money could be spent on the aging and needey part of the population.
    BRING BACK THE DEATH PENALTY AND INCLUDE MAJOR DRUG TRAFFIKERS , may they rot in hell.

    Reply
  17. Colleen E Harvey August 13, 2017 at 1:55 pm

    Good for his ass. Locked him up and throw away the key.

    Reply

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