More HELP for QEH

Brewery donates to hospital chapel

Banks Holdings Limited (BHL) has intervened in the spiritual health services of the state-run Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH) with a $10,000 donation to spruce up the hospital’s chapel, which has been in need of a facelift for the past five years.

In accepting the donation, QEH Chief Executive Officer Dr Dexter James said it was a welcome intervention, since there was a lot the remedial work to be done on the chapel.

“Over the last seven to ten years, all the donations that have come into the hospital have predominantly been for clinical services. So this donation today by Banks Holdings Limited is special to us because its focus on one aspect of health in its broadest sense, which is the development of one’s spirituality.

“It does in fact need some amount of work and therefore in this first phase these funds will be used predominantly for improving the aesthetics and hygiene of the environment. We will seek to paint the facility, we will seek to install proper signage, repair some of the pews and certainly brighten the facility so that it enriches the soul,” Dr James said.

The hospital executive also reported that since the launch of its philanthropic drive about three years ago, the hospital has raised $10.3 million, primarily for capital improvements.

BHL has made a $10,000 donation to spruce up the hospital’s chapel.

He said the outpouring of financial support was a sign that the private sector was behind the hospital’s efforts to develop health services.

“We are on the right track. We don’t always get it right, but for the most part our focus and vision for developing hospital services have been well accepted by corporate Barbados,” he stressed.

Today’s donation forms part of BHL’s corporate social responsibility programme dubbed Heritage, Environment, Learning and People (HELP), according to Manager of Corporate Affairs Sophia Cambridge.

She said the beverage manufacturer thought it critical to find an avenue that would cater to QEH staff, as well as the general public.

“We chose the chapel particularly because we wanted to focus on both the spiritual and physical needs of those who have cause to be in this facility,” she said.

Cambridge said the contribution was the start of a three-year programme to support the hospital’s chapel.

“We are not putting a full stop at the end of that particular contribution. We will be moving forward to see how we can assist, particularly on the spiritual side. What has come to our attention is that many patrons of the hospital have forgotten that the chapel exists,” she said.

Meanwhile the hospital’s chaplain Canon Noel Burke welcomed the donation, saying spiritual care continued to play a major role in recuperation.

Burke pointed out that the 41-year-old chapel did not only serve relatives of patients, but that from time to time various groups would make use of it. 

3 Responses to More HELP for QEH

  1. Jennifer December 13, 2016 at 9:02 am

    Now that the chapel cost is covered, can we get a donation from someone else to change the mattresses to be more fitting for the sick elderly and the long term sick, thereby reducing the risk of bed sores. one person i know went in there for 5 days and came out with a superficial (now starting) sacral sore.

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  2. helicopter(8P) December 13, 2016 at 10:19 am

    Now that’s a great participation in owning your country’s estate nationals! Our children and grandchildren can now reflect in the future days and say ” Our grand parents made great strides in passing on these properties to us”! We salute Bank’s Holding’s Limited for its humanitarian effort and gift to the Q E H.

    Reply
  3. Tony Webster December 13, 2016 at 9:15 pm

    While there are kind-hearted folks, and corporations, who both try to help the Q.E.H., the current policy of “positive philanthropy” ( i.e., the initiative sometimes comes FROM the Q,E.H….and is therefore variant of mendicancy) I feel is misplaced and smacks of desperation-plasters where major surgery is necessary.

    The unmistakable irony is that whatever “sucess” is met with in reaping such assistance, necessarily tends to postpone, or mask the greater need, that is, for new high-level policies to re-structure the health system en toto, and to overcome the basic failings now taken almost as “normal”- as@Jennifer above points out.

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