NCC promotes use of Sargassum seaweed

The National Conservation Commission (NCC) has been educating the general public about the many uses of Sargassum seaweed, in an effort to change the negative connotations associated with the product.

“A lot of people are trying to shy away from the Sargassum seaweed because of the smell, but that’s basically because you are on the beach and there is moisture… the Sargassum seaweed is starting to decompose. With that decomposition comes a scent,” nursery supervisor Sean Phillips said.

Phillips told participants that the seaweed was a great asset to their farms and gardens as it could serve both as mulch, because of its water retention capabilities, and also as a pest control agent due to its high salt concentration.

He added that by adding the seaweed to the soil, farmers will “get a robust growth”.

“Our plan is to try to highlight it [the use of Sargassum seaweed] throughout the communities, so it would no longer be seen as a curse but it would be seen as a blessing as well,” Phillips said.

Special Projects Officer, Ricardo Marshall said they wanted to expose the public to the uses of the seaweed “so that they can get a lot of information and…take this new knowledge…and utilise it in their homes, gardens and around their premises”.

The practical demonstration was part of the week of activities held by the NCC to commemorate National Arbor Day, which is observed on September 22 in remembrance of Hurricane Janet which devastated Barbados in 1955. (KK)

5 Responses to NCC promotes use of Sargassum seaweed

  1. michael parker September 27, 2015 at 4:32 am

    typical goverment jumping on the band wagon after cavendish atwell disclosed that sargassum can be used as a composte to aid plant growth, give credit where its due and give cavendish reward for highlighting this rather than jumping on the bandwagon.

    Reply
  2. sam clarke September 28, 2015 at 12:41 pm

    FINALLY THE NCC HAVE GOTTEN INVOLVED. WHY DOES IT HAVE TO TAKE SO LONG FOR THIS TO HAPPENED? THEY WERE LOCAL EXPERTS BEGGING FOR THIS TO BE DONE, AND DOING IT ALL BY THEMSELVES. A BUNCH OF SQUARE PEGS IN ROUND HOLES.

    Reply
  3. Alex 3 November 14, 2015 at 2:57 pm

    So by extension if you water your garden, flowers and lawns with seawater they will grow better?
    I don’t think so.
    Using this a mulch will eventually mean the salt leeches out into the soil, its salinity will increase and then plants will not grow.
    What nonsense is the NCC spreading here?
    Maybe a better use would be a a biofuel wherein it is fermented to produce alcohol for addition to gasoline or if possible to collect methane for use domestically with NG.

    Reply
  4. Matthieu B November 17, 2015 at 12:34 pm

    Promoting the fertilizing power of the sargassum without explanations is indeed counterproductive.
    Salt is not good for the soil. To use seaweed as a fertilizer, you need to wash the sand and salt from it.
    Which means the best seaweed you can re-use is the one collected at sea, and not on the beaches.
    Which means it has to be cleaned, something almost no collecting solutions does (except the ones developped by CDO Innov).
    Which means that if you want to really turn the sargassum into a strength, you have to invest in proper collecting devices, as the collecting is the very first step in the valorization process.

    Reply
  5. Andrew Rudder December 10, 2015 at 12:04 pm

    Lots of barges can be gotten around the industrial sea ports and they can be modified and converted to specific standards for the harvesting and transportation of seaweed. A hoist and winch along with a skimmer are the only tools needed.

    Reply

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