SBA directive

Ministry tells teachers to mark papers or students will lose out

All School Based Assessments (SBAs) must be graded by teachers.

That directive is coming from the Ministry of Education in response to the Barbados Secondary Teachers’ Union (BSTU) claim that students will not be disadvantaged by the decision of its members not to grade SBAs.

In a press release issued today, the Ministry warned that it was the children who would lose out since they could not get a grade for CSEC or CAPE subjects without a marked SBA.

Noting that neither the Ministry nor the Caribbean Examination Council (CXC) could mark SBAs, as that is a continuous assessment that must be done at the school, the Ministry said it was the responsibility of a subject teacher to mark students’ work and submit it.

“For the record, submitted means marked with a score . . . CXC is responsible for the marking of the examination and provides the student’s overall grades based on the marked SBA, submitted by the school, and the score obtained by the student in the examination.

“The student will therefore be disadvantaged if the SBA is not marked, and will also be disadvantaged in their pursuit of higher education at universities and other tertiary institutions or entry into Sixth Form, because they will not be awarded a grade for a CSEC or CAPE subject without the graded SBA submitted by the teacher,” the release said.

On this basis, the Ministry dismissed the BSTU assertion that it was the responsibility of CXC to get the SBAs graded once they were submitted.

5 Responses to SBA directive

  1. Terry Clarke
    Terry Clarke April 3, 2015 at 8:22 am

    Some things are totally off with Ms. Mary Ann Redman. If you thought for a moment that the problem with the educational system in Barbados started with principals like Mr. Broome and Mr. Farley, please think again.

    Reply
  2. Elvis Howard
    Elvis Howard April 3, 2015 at 9:25 am

    Deal with issues not personality. It did not only start with them. Let us be fair.

    Reply
  3. Carl Harper April 3, 2015 at 11:49 am

    The “SBAs, as that is a continuous assessment that must be done at the school”.

    Utter rubbish! SBA is simply a name and does not imply that grading should be done at school one bit. The assessment could have been called “CXC Assessment” or by some other name.

    It is CXC’s responsibility to ensure that those papers are graded once submitted to its office on time. Of course, that can be done at schools if CXC would fork out some cash and pay teachers to grade them. Problem solved!

    Secondary school teachers refusing to grade SBAs will not be responsible for disadvantaging students going on to universities or other tertiary institutions of learning. The Ministry of Education should quit trying to place teachers on some kind of guilt trip, as though they are doing something ever so wrong. All teachers are doing is finally taking a stand to make a wrong situation right, and there is no better time to do it.

    What will prevent many students from attending UWI is the tuition payment policy imposed on the “bright poor” by this DLP government, and the inability to make promised bursaries available for them to stay enrolled and complete their studies.

    Reply
  4. Samuel Morrison April 3, 2015 at 4:18 pm

    Carl Harper is either a fool or a puppet. He surely does not understand what is a SCHOOL BASED ASSESSMENT. HOW CAN SOMEBODY WHO DID NOT SET THE TOPIC OF THE ASSIGNMENTS, NEGOTIATE THE FREQUENCY OF THE SUBMISSION, POINT OUT THE STRENGTH OF THE WORK. DOT THE EYES AND CROSS THE T’s NOW PUT A MARK ON THE ASSIGNMENT. SHOULD THEY ALSO CORRECT THE HOME ECONOMICS ASSIGNMENT WHICH IS A PRACTICAL OR THE LAB TESTS WHICH ARE ALL DONE IN SCHOOLS. THE BSTU IS A LAWLESS UNION AND ITS MEMBERS ARE LOOKING TO GET MONEY ILLEGALLY. SHAME ON THESE PIMPS FOR ABUSING OUR CHILDREN.

    Reply
  5. sandra basc April 3, 2015 at 6:37 pm

    Well said Samuel.

    Reply

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