BL&P action in breach of law

Barbados Light & Power’s (BL&P) correspondence to workers last week informing them of plans to cut staff was a breach of not only Protocol VI of the Social Partnership, but also provisions of the Employment Rights Act.

That was the Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU) position at the conclusion of a two-hour meeting with BL&P workers at the union’s Solidarity House headquarters tonight.

From left, President of the union’s BL&P division Howard Griffith, shop steward Jeffrey Richards and BWU Assistant General Secretary Orlando Gabby Scott after tonight’s meeting.
From left, President of the union’s BL&P division Howard Griffith, shop steward Jeffrey Richards and BWU Assistant General Secretary Orlando Gabby Scott after tonight’s meeting.

“Any correspondence indicating that there were plans to lay off workers must be addressed to the bargaining agent of the workers, not the workers themselves,” Assistant General Secretary Orlando Gabby Scott said after the talks.

He also stressed that any meeting between the union and the company would have to be called by Minister of Labour Senator Esther Byer who is also the chairperson of the sub-committee of the Social Partnership.

In a circular dated March 25, the BL&P informed workers of a cost-cutting plan that would result in some job losses.

The union has urged BL&P to withdraw the correspondence until it has written to the Labour Minister and formally requested a meeting with the BWU.

3 Responses to BL&P action in breach of law

  1. Andrew The Voice March 31, 2015 at 6:42 am

    If this is true these people either DON’T KNOW or DON’T CARE about labor laws.

    Reply
  2. Adrian March 31, 2015 at 10:52 am

    Nicaragua has the lowest electricity generation, as well as the lowest percentage of population with access to electricity. The unbundling and privatization process of the 1990s did not achieve the expected objectives, resulting in very little generation capacity added to the system. This, together with its high dependence on oil for electricity generation (the highest in the region), led to an energy crisis in 2006 from which the country has not fully recovered yet.
    Barbados did not see this coming when we allowed our Electricity company to be bought over by “The Canadians”. Who gave the order to reduce operating expenses by $17 million in the first year, and a total of $30 million over the 24 month period? Have they considered tapping into renewable energy – wind and sunlight – and doing a proper cost benefit analysis?
    Reduce the use of oil and your operating costs will drop significantly. Sending home staff should never be seen as a first resort to cutting operating costs.

    Reply
  3. Patrick Blackman March 31, 2015 at 10:55 am

    I told my sister two years ago about this company and what their practices were and now its started. When they finish, the company will be half its former size (workers) and light bill be about $500 per month for average households, remember I said it here…

    Reply

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