NO-GO

Organizers refuse spectators’ call for more entertainment at BSSAC

Spectators at today’s semifinals of the Barbados Secondary Schools Athletic Championships (BSSAC) have made a suggestion to the meet’s organizers: Follow the blueprint of the National Primary School Athletic Championships (NAPSAC)!

However, a senior BSSAC official has quickly shot down the suggestion that the meet should provide more entertainment for spectators and students.

Citing a major difference in atmosphere and excitement between the two events, those who flocked to the National Stadium have called for a revamp of the secondary schools’ meet.

One lady, who declined to give her name, told Barbados TODAY that having attended the finals of NAPSAC on Wednesday, it was a complete “culture shock” coming to the stadium today.

“BSSAC is dead. Having come from experiencing that electrifying atmosphere with all the music and entertainment at NAPSAC yesterday I am very disappointed,” she said.

“Maybe what BSSAC’s organizers should do is to take some pointers from the organizers of NAPSAC. I’m not saying they have to copy them, but they should look at what NAPSAC has done to make that event such a success and come up with ideas to do the same for BSSAC.”

But the chairman of BSSAC, Vasco Dash, was adamant that no such changes would be made to the meet.

He insisted there was a major difference between hosting an event for primary schools as opposed to one for older children.

“There is no possibility that we will be bringing back drums or providing music in future meets,” Dash said.

“We have the reputation of the schools and the meet to look out for. We don’t want sometime later down to see on social media a lot of things which transpired in the stands that shouldn’t have.

Sandra Ifill, who was watching the action from the ‘D’ stand, also lamented that the atmosphere was dull.

Sandra Ifill (left) and Jason Jordan described the atmosphere as dead.
Sandra Ifill (left) and Jason Jordan described the atmosphere as dead.

Ifill, a regular spectator at BSSAC, said although she was enjoying the performances of the athletes on the track, something was definitely missing.

“I’m enjoying myself, but the atmosphere is dead. I think the organizers should look at trying to make it more exciting,” she suggested.

Claud Haddock said while his main reason for being there was to support his two children, Ajani and Leilani, he felt more could be done to enhance the atmosphere.

Claud Haddock says he will continue to come to BSSAC.
Claud Haddock says he will continue to come to BSSAC.

A regular attendee at NAPSAC, Haddock queried why music was played at the primary school meet but                   not at BSSAC.

“Today has been a bit dead so far. It is normally noisier than this.

“I’ve always wondered why music is played at NAPSAC but not here,” Haddock noted.

“I remember when there used to be drums playing and children chanting and stuff like that . . . maybe the organizers should look at bringing that back.”

However, he insisted the issue would not deter him from coming back in the future.

The parents of Combermere star-athlete, Ashlee Lowe, praised the event, saying they had seen a big improvement over last year’s meet.

While also praising the high level of competition on the track, Pat Brathwaite-Lowe and Wayne Lowe admitted some entertainment should be provided.

Pat Brathwaite-Lowe and Wayne Lowe would like to see some more entertainment at BSSAC.
Pat Brathwaite-Lowe and Wayne Lowe would like to see some more entertainment at BSSAC.

“This year things are running a lot smoother and more on time than last year, but it could be more entertaining,” Brathwaite-Lowe said.

“Maybe some music or some cheerleaders in between events would help to spice things up,” she added.

She also said there needed to be some improvement in the sound system, as spectators in the ‘D’ stand could not hear what was being said by the announcer.

randybennett@barbadostoday.bb

5 Responses to NO-GO

  1. Livi Bancroft
    Livi Bancroft March 27, 2015 at 7:13 am

    Mr. Dash still hard-headed i see lol. When he says no, its no. :/

    Reply
  2. kiwi March 27, 2015 at 7:36 am

    They took the drums and music from our forefather’s. They took our languages, singing and chanting. They took our clothes, hair styles, body decorations and banned almost any known or perceived practice or anything that was of cultural and of spiritual significance to the black African slave. Yes, the European slave owners did that to ‘maintain order’ and to keep the slaves from being empowered. But they couldn’t do it alone. They needed help from a source that was familiar to the slaves, someone that they trusted. So they trained and indoctrinated selected black slaves, the ‘head niggers’, to enforce the deculturlization of their own people. This was necessary for them to weaken the enslaved black race and to ensure that their generations 300 years from then would remain weak, culturally enslave snd submissive. It appears, in our present-day that our black leaders are taking a cue from their white slave masters. The oppressed has now become the oppressors in so many ways. The ‘head nigger’ mentality is still very much alive in secular government. The excuse given that banning the celebrations of our young men and women at school sports is necessary to maintain civil order is straight from the white slave master’s manual. It is disrespeful to the black people of Barbados.

    Reply
  3. Kevin March 27, 2015 at 9:57 am

    Lets be frank. When the drums are in the stands the students will wuk-up and get on dixie. Nothing wrong with that. But some students go overboard with the wukking-up with each other and some engage in unwholesome behavior. That’s why officials imposed the ban, in order to stamp out that behavior. Here’s a solution. Bring back the drums and bring in some ‘Wuk-up’ police.

    Reply
  4. Tony Waterman March 27, 2015 at 4:13 pm

    @kiwi !!!! “WoW” i didn’t know that we had anyone with this much franknes left in them, tell me “KIWI” do you actually live in Barbados ?? reason for asking is i never though i would live long enough to read something like this from an AFFLUENT Bajan living in Barbados.

    Reply
  5. Tony Waterman March 27, 2015 at 4:19 pm

    “”But the chairman of BSSAC, Vasco Dash, was adamant that no such changes would be made to the meet.
    He insisted there was a major difference between hosting an event for primary schools as opposed to one for older children.
    “There is no possibility that we will be bringing back drums or providing music in future meets,” Dash said.
    “We have the reputation of the schools and the meet to look out for. We don’t want sometime later down to see on social media a lot of things which transpired in the stands that shouldn’t have.””

    Don’t understand his reasoning at all, one would think that the older Children, would better understand what is expected of them. this looks to me like this is an I am the BOSS Attitude, this is another reason why Barbados becoming a Republic is SCARY

    Reply

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