Global sports roundup

Thumbs down

COLOMBO – Sri Lankan captain Mahela Jayawardene has given the thumbs down to new One-Day International rules introduced by the International Cricket Council.

He said today in Kandy ahead of tomorrow`s third ODI against the Kiwis that the rules which came into force in the ongoing Sri Lanka-New Zealand series were a bowlers` nightmare.

“The rule which makes mandatory for five fielders inside the circle has brought in added pressure on bowlers,” Jayawardene said.

He added that sides need to be stronger in batting as in a chase they would have to be in pursuit of bigger targets.

“It is difficult for the bowlers to do well. They come under added pressure as boundaries would be easy to come by with just four fielders permitted outside in the non power- play overs,” Jayawardene said.

Jayawardene said Sri Lanka needed to adjust to the new rules.

The team had experimented a few plans to suit the new rules in the second ODI yesterday which Sri Lanka won to take a 1-0 lead.

 

Federer calls for more drug testing

LONDON – Roger Federer wants more drug testing in tennis and says he is being tested less than in previous years.

The 17-time Grand Slam winner was asked about the current regime after Andy Murray had called for more testing.

“I feel I’m being less tested now than six, seven, eight years ago,” said the world number one.

“I don’t know the reasons we are being tested less and I agree with Andy, we don’t do a lot of blood testing during the year. I’m OK having more of that.”

The available International Tennis Federation anti-doping records only highlight individual players for the last two years, and show that Federer underwent four to six in-competition and one to three out-of-competition tests during 2011, and more than seven in-competition and one to three out-of-competition tests during 2010.

These figures are for ITF and World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada) tests and do not include those carried out by national anti-doping organisations.

It is not specified whether the ITF/Wada tests used urine or blood samples, but the ITF data does show that only 18 male specimens were collected through out-of-competition blood testing in tennis throughout the whole of 2011, and six during 2010.

This is something that particularly concerned Murray in the light of revelations in cycling about widespread blood doping.

 

World cycling body being sued

SYDNEY – The International Cycling Union (UCI) are being sued by a sponsor for a “total loss of confidence in professional cycling by the public”.

Australian company Skins has taken legal action for £1.25m for the UCI’s handling of the Lance Armstrong case.

Skins’ chairman Jaimie Fuller suing cycling body.

Armstrong has been stripped of seven Tour de France titles between 1999 and 2005 for doping.

Skins accuse UCI president Pat McQuaid and his predecessor Hein Verbruggen of “gross mismanagement”.

The UCI has commissioned an independent investigation into the Armstrong affair after the United States Anti-Doping Agency (Usada) claimed the American led “the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen”.

Skins, a sports clothing manufacturer, has sponsored world cycling for five years and chairman Jaimie Fuller said: “The events of the last several months have made it abundantly clear that world cycling has not been the sport the general public and the corporate partners thought it was.

 

SYDNEY – The International Cycling Union (UCI) are being sued by a sponsor for a “total loss of confidence in professional cycling by the public”.

Australian company Skins has taken legal action for £1.25m for the UCI’s handling of the Lance Armstrong case.

Armstrong has been stripped of seven Tour de France titles between 1999 and 2005 for doping.

Skins accuse UCI president Pat McQuaid and his predecessor Hein Verbruggen of “gross mismanagement”.

The UCI has commissioned an independent investigation into the Armstrong affair after the United States Anti-Doping Agency (Usada) claimed the American led “the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen”.

Skins, a sports clothing manufacturer, has sponsored world cycling for five years and chairman Jaimie Fuller said: “The events of the last several months have made it abundantly clear that world cycling has not been the sport the general public and the corporate partners thought it was.

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