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NEW YORK – Separated

NEW YORK – From his bed next to the window, Jadon squeezes his father’s finger with all his might, even under heavy sedation. Anias rests in a bed near the door of the room, a testament to strength and resilience.

Just the sight of the boys in separate beds came as a surprise to their parents.

“It’s shockingly new,” said their mother, Nicole McDonald. The boys have shared a bed since birth.

Dr James Goodrich, seated centre left, lead a surgical team through a 27-hour surgery that separated twins Jadon and Anias McDonald last Thursday.

Dr James Goodrich, seated centre left, lead a surgical team through a 27-hour surgery that separated twins Jadon and Anias McDonald last Thursday.

Born conjoined at the head, the 13-month-old twins — little “warriors”, their parents call them — spent the weekend recovering from the 27-hour surgery that separated them.

“I can’t wait to put them beside each other and them see each other,” said Christian, their father. “To be honest, I’m just so excited and anxious to see that moment. That’s going to be a great day.”

The surgery — which began early Thursday and ended shortly before 1 p.m. Friday — took place at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. It was led by neurosurgeon Dr James Goodrich, considered the leading expert on what’s known as craniopagus surgery.

The first 72 hours of recovery were most critical for long-term survival, doctors told the parents. Christian said the boys were stable and doing well after a weekend of challenges.

Anias suffered a few seizures on Saturday, including one that lasted for 45 minutes, Christian said. The seizures have since been brought under control with the anti-seizure medicine Ativan, he said.

Jadon has yet to move his left side. Though that is troubling, Christian remains optimistic. “That’s not something really worrying Dr Goodrich right now,” the father said. “He says that’s not out of the ordinary. Hopefully, in time, he will start moving that side.”

Both boys have opened their eyes, although they are heavily sedated and hooked up to an array of medical equipment. They’re too fragile for Mom and Dad to pick them up just yet.

“Jadon will squeeze your fingers and not let go, on his right side,” said Christian. “They’re really doing pretty good, considering the surgery they went through.”

The parents are now in a waiting game as to when Jadon and Anias become fully alert.

Goodrich and lead plastic surgeon Dr. Oren Tepper said in a joint statement Monday afternoon that “so far, the recovery course has gone as expected”.

“We are hoping to be able to extubate Jadon in the upcoming days, and Anias we expect to take longer as we work to control his blood pressure issues,” the doctors said.

They added that both boys would probably have to undergo more reconstruction surgery: “We expect that parts of the incisions on both boys’ heads will need some revision.”

The separation surgery was the fourth procedure for the boys — and the most complicated. The twins awoke from the first two surgeries after about a week; after the third surgery, it took about a month “for them to be back to themselves”, Christian said.

He expects a similar recovery this time. “The more difficult the surgery,” he said, “the longer the recovery.”

Dad spent a good bit of time this weekend bonding with the couple’s 3-year-old son, Aza, while Mom camped out in the twins’ room, loving every second of the reunion.

One of the most poignant moments occurred Friday afternoon as the parents waited for Anias to get out of surgery. Jadon had been wheeled out of the operating room about 7 that morning and brought up to the pediatric intensive care unit, or PICU, but Anias’ operation was taking much longer.

Christian plopped to the floor of the PICU. Nicole bent over in agony. They’d been told Anias would be brought there any moment, but a 20-minute wait turned into an hour.

Suddenly, about 1 p.m., medical personnel with dark circles under their eyes emerged from the elevator. Nicole stood with her hands clasped in prayer, Christian by her side. He wiped a tear from his right eye and put his arm around his wife of four years.

They’d waited for this moment since the boys were born at 11:11 p.m. on September 9, 2015 — and even before that, when they first learned in May 2015 that the boys were conjoined in utero.

Their faces lit up when Anias was wheeled out. Excruciating agony gave way to pure joy and raw emotion. Nicole immediately kissed Anias on his left cheek, tears flowing down her face.

“Hey, Buddy, you look beautiful,” Christian said, leaning in for a kiss and blowing on his forehead. “I love you, Pumpkin. You look just like your brother.”

Anias was carefully pushed down the hall into the same corner room with Jadon.

Source: (CNN)

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