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Mom’s painful scars

Eastmond pain still raw, three months after daughter’s sudden death

Nearly three months after her daughter died suddenly, leaving behind three young children, Cora Eastmond’s emotional scars are far from healed.

Twenty-seven-year-old Melissa Eastmond died on July 26, moments after telling her family she felt tired and was going to take a nap.

Her sudden passing left the family shattered, particularly her mother, with whom Melissa had enjoyed a close relationship.

And today, while receiving a donation of food items and cash from the Yes We Care committee of Baobab Tower, Eastmond said the pain was still raw.

Cora Eastmond says it’s been difficult for her and her family to cope since Melissa’s passing.

Cora Eastmond says it’s been difficult for her and her family to cope since Melissa’s passing.

Inconsolable at times, the grieving mother also appealed for assistance in the form of counselling.   

“I holding on three months here but it still hurts. It hurts very, very, much because my daughter and me use to live like mother and daughter, sister and friends. It is as if it happen yesterday. It hurting me very, very much. I don’t like to talk about this honest. I don’t know if people would understand,” she told Barbados TODAY after the presentation.

When Melissa died she left behind twin boys who were a month shy of their second birthday, and a nine-month-old baby girl.

Eastmond said the children had difficulty coping and there were times when they would wake up in the middle of the night crying.

“Their uncles and aunty does come for them and ask for them, so they well looked after. The children don’t quite understand, they believe she gone to come back.

The deceased woman’s children and another relative taking a nap.

The deceased woman’s children and another relative taking a nap.

“Up to couple nights ago one of twins get up crying and staring at the ceiling and it was only when the neighbour took him for a drive that he stop,” she said.

Melissa was the only person in the household who worked, and following her death her unemployed mother said she simply did not know how she would find the emotional and financial strength to care for the children.

The grieving mother also said at the time she would welcome any assistance to help with her grandchildren because she was determined to keep a promise she had made to her daughter.

“Earlier this year Melissa asked me to take care of the children if anything happen to her. She say, ‘mummy if anything happen to me I don’t want anybody else raise my children but you. The father could come and look for them but I want you to raise my children’. I will do it,” Eastmond pledged then.

A number of individuals and organizations have responded to her plea, the latest being the Yes We Care committee with today’s donation.

From left, Bonita Morgan and William Warner of the Yes We Care committee of Baobab Tower which presented food and money to Cora Eastmond.

From left, Bonita Morgan and William Warner of the Yes We Care committee of Baobab Tower which presented food and money to Cora Eastmond.

And, even as the 58-year-old continued to weep, she expressed heartfelt thanks for the assistance she received in her most trying times.

“I think it is so good and I appreciate it. I am trying to get myself together to write a thank you note but I can’t get myself together. I might have to get somebody else to do it for me. Without the help I get and getting, it would be difficult. It is really helping a great deal.”

“I appreciate it with my whole heart. My family and me appreciate it a lot, and to all the people that help, I would like to say a warm thank to them,” Eastmond emphasized.

Nonetheless, her words of gratitude did not extend to the father of Melissa’s three children, Fabian Maynard.

Mere days after Melissa’s passing, Maynard confessed to Barbados TODAY he had been a delinquent dad, and he promised to shape up and play an active role in his children’s lives.

“I got to be there. I ain’t leaving them. I gine always be there to support in whatever way I can. As I say I neglect from before, so I know I got to do a lot now,” Maynard said at the time, adding that he had expected strong criticism from the public, but he was prepared to take the flak because he deserved it.

However, Eastmond today said it was all talk and there had been no action since.

“He went in the paper saying that he going to be there for the children, but up to now not a cent . . . . So all of that putting strain on me and I want you all to put this in the paper,” a tearful Eastmond said.

colvillecounsey@barbadostoday.bb

13 Responses to Mom’s painful scars

  1. Judy Stanford
    Judy Stanford October 14, 2016 at 11:55 pm

    That “father” needs to be forced to support his children. Cora Eastmond, hang in there because those babies need you. You can do it!!

    Reply
  2. Anne Ince
    Anne Ince October 15, 2016 at 12:01 am

    Where is the delinquent sperm donor ?

    Reply
  3. Veroniva Boyce
    Veroniva Boyce October 15, 2016 at 1:42 am

    Wastemen reminds me of a missing piece in a jigsaw puzzle. You look high and low and can’t find the missing piece. You either give up looking or put the puzzle away and hope one day, a week, a month or before the end of the year you find the missing piece. Some young men have been brought up by a single parent mum aka the breadwinner, the HEAD of the household and have seen how mum had to work extremely hard to provide for them. It’s seems that the waste-men have learnt nothing or they refuse to acknowledge what it was like for them when mum had to struggle to raise them as best as she can, some mums do without to put food on the table, clothed and educated her offspring not forgetting the verbal discipline including lashes to bring them up as decent law abiding citizens. Now who do these wastemen think brought them up? About time the cockroaches break the cycle of hop on, off I laid my sperm and run, have some respect and face their responsibilities and look after their children. They will not be children forever as one can see they grow up to be adults. It takes two to make a child and the same applies to raise a child. Women a few minutes of pleasure with a worthless wasteman becomes a life time burden wunna could do better use contraceptives or shut the shop. I hope the father or fathers of the children do the right thing and help support granny (God Bless her) not with long talk, financial, without her the children will be awarded to the state i.e. a children’s home or fostered. The local businesses e.g. Supermarket could offer granny at least six months food supplies and the government could increase her pension. Something must be done to help gran.

    Reply
  4. Anfaani Henry
    Anfaani Henry October 15, 2016 at 1:54 am

    Talk is cheap
    Go dig potatoes and sell. And do for your kids.

    Reply
  5. Julia Robinson
    Julia Robinson October 15, 2016 at 2:05 am

    Aww, sad to see her crying. Don’t stress, it will all work out. Who care where the father is.

    Reply
  6. Brewster October 15, 2016 at 4:33 am

    I am so sorry for your loss. This is really sad. Those that can give should do so. On my next visit to Barbados I will do my part too. The Almighty will give you the strength to keep and maintain those children. It may be a struggle but you will get through.You are in need of counselling seek advice. God bless you!

    Reply
  7. Alec Pierre October 15, 2016 at 8:20 am

    This is a very difficult for Ms Eastmond on many levels but you might have included her address in your article. That would be helpful. My heart goes out to the family!

    Reply
  8. Sue Donym October 15, 2016 at 1:47 pm

    And the PM claims not to understand about single mothers? Hopefully the father will feel enough shame to not let his children depend on the kindness of others. Women, remember the name (Fabian Maynard), red flag!

    Reply
  9. Olutoye Walrond October 15, 2016 at 2:14 pm

    How can we help? Is there a fund some where?

    Reply
  10. Von October 15, 2016 at 5:12 pm

    Heart breaking story; I am hurting for this family; how can I help? Before you know it, these little ones will be adults; they don’t remain small; won’t even mention their father except to say: He and his conscience will have a talk and hopefully he will do the right thing; these little ones didn’t ask to be here so why should they have to suffer. Man grow up and do your part as a parent. C’mon…
    Sad…

    Reply
  11. ch October 17, 2016 at 12:14 am

    Finance is critical for all families raising children- many people have to fill the void left by parents and it is tough but they do it without begging.
    By now, the adults in that family should be working, including granny, even if it is a three-day week. The children can go into daycare at a Government nursery.
    All now, the father should be paying court-enforced child support since he is not a man.
    I understand charity and humanity but these people need to be empowered to manage their own lives and not depend on handouts.
    Do not let these children grow up with a dependent , helpless mentality. That was not the example set by their mother.

    Reply

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