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Too many women in low-paying, non-technical jobs

Women continue to be under-represented in the infrastructure sector, and the ones they occupied are unstable and pay little, according to Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Transport and Works (MTW) Simone Rudder.

However, Rudder told the launch of the MTW Gender Equality Workshop at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford on Monday, the imbalance which exists in the technical areas of Government service was due to choice, not to women being shut out. “Women are especially under-represented in industries such as transport and construction . . . There are currently relatively few women who have chosen to pursue careers in the technical areas of the public sector,” Rudder said.

The week-long event is being hosted by MTW and the Inter-American Development Bank and is the first phase of a project to sensitize 280 women. Phase two will provide the necessary training through work attachment in technical ministries, Rudder said.

The Government official explained there were about one thousand women and about 16,000 men in each of these industries while women were highly represented in industries such as food services and a combination of wholesale and retail with over 20, 000 working in these sectors.

However, Rudder said the sectors which attracted women provide less job security and less pay.

“More men than women are employed but yet more women find themselves in jobs that are under-paid and unstable and this is not right,” the MTW Permanent Secretary said.

The workshop is seen as a step towards fulfillment of the fifth in the 17 United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals, which has been ratified by Barbados, and which speaks to the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.

6 Responses to Too many women in low-paying, non-technical jobs

  1. Brien King
    Brien King September 28, 2016 at 5:24 am

    If these women don’t like what they are being paid, they have the option to quit the job. The employer is required to comply with the law of the land in term of wages, where a minimum wage is set, if the employer pays under the minimum wage, then that employer is at fault of breaking the law, but if that employer pays the wage requires by law or even a bit higher, then that employee should be thankful for what they have, as many don’t have what they got.

    Reply
    • Donild Trimp September 28, 2016 at 9:52 am

      Brien King, don’t get the connection between your comment and the gist of the article.

      There is nothing in your comment that addresses the issue of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.

      Quotes from the article, “Women are especially under-represented in industries such as transport and construction”

      “the sectors which attracted women provide less job security and less pay”.

      The imbalance which exists in the technical areas of Government service was due to choice, not to women being shut out.

      This event is “the first phase of a project to sensitize 280 women. Phase two will provide the necessary training through work attachment in technical ministries”

      Everything seems quite clear to me. Don’t understanding what you are are griping about.

      Reply
  2. Maaz A Love
    Maaz A Love September 28, 2016 at 6:14 am

    Ok…my treat. Lol!

    Reply
  3. Hal Austin September 28, 2016 at 11:44 am

    There is dignity in work. Barbadians need jobs. Let’s talk about the quality later.
    I remember a couple years ago a Bajan plumber gave it all up to be a lawyer. How misguided.
    In London lawyers re-train to be plumbers.

    Reply
  4. jrsmith September 28, 2016 at 1:12 pm

    @ , Hal ,A, hail hail, on the button , living between the (UK) and (Barbados) I thought bajan women achieved more than men in the job market , in management not really impress with bajan men .. still not putting bajan men down, because in the (UK) having a job in many parts of industry they have to work,, as I have seen as was part of management for 27 years in the (UK)..

    I am for women in management they carry a better attitude toward managing.. as like the issues which is changing for women in the (UK).. lets hope this comes soon to Barbados..

    The issue of lawyer to plumber, lawyer to electrician and lawyer to welder is being achieved across the board….

    Reply
  5. Carson C Cadogan September 28, 2016 at 1:42 pm

    Well, Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Transport and Works (MTW) Simone Rudder, the only way to correct this imbalance would be to give all “low-paying, non-technical jobs” to men.

    Lets see how that would work out.

    Reply

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