TRINIDAD – New Gulf of Paria oil spill

PORT OF SPAIN – State-owned Petrotrin began cleaning up oil stained waters in the Gulf of Paria on Thursday night, following reports of oil deposits at Mosquito Creek and beaches in La Brea, Vessigny, Clifton Hill/ Guapo, and Cedros.

Tiger Tanks Trinidad Unlimited was contracted to mop up the oil. An oil containment boom was placed along the coastline, near Mosquito Creek.

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Booms placed on the water near the Shore of Peace Cremation Site, Mosquito Creek South Oropouche to contain the spill which came shore on Trinidad’s Gulf of Paria coastline overnight.

Petrotrin stated, “Consistent with our response in relation to a similar report received yesterday involving oil at Fullerton Beach, Cedros, a team of officials responded immediately and observed oil sheens and patches of oil on the sand at these locations.” The Ministry of Energy and Energy Industries, the Environmental Management Authority (EMA) and the Office of Disaster Preparedness Management were notified and Petrotrin officials conducted two helicopter fly-overs of the south-western shoreline and the Gulf of Paria.

The company stated that no discernible sources of oil or leaks were observed. Incident Command Teams were established to conduct a thorough examination of Petrotrin’s facilities, particularly offshore and submarine infrastructure to determine if the company’s installations were in any way connected to the oil sightings.

A close-up view of the damage done to the shoreline on the Mosquito Creek where an oil spill occurred on Thursday night. This follows an alleged spill two weeks ago in Otaheite where dead fish were found.
A close-up view of the damage done to the shoreline on the Mosquito Creek where an oil spill occurred on Thursday night. This follows an alleged spill two weeks ago in Otaheite where dead fish were found.

All available resources have been mobilized to manage the situation, Petrotrin stated. Two weeks ago, fishermen expressed concerns following the discovered of thousands of dead fish along the coastline near Mosquito Creek. Fishermen and Friends of the Sea (FFOC) claimed that the fish kill was caused by Corexit, an oil dispersent, used to clean up an oil spill back in 2013. However, laboratory tests by the EMA and Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) confirmed the fish did not die from poisoning.

Source: (Trinidad Express)

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