Leacock: Teachers and parents must lead by example

President of the Barbados Association of Guidance Counsellors (BAGC) Saul Leacock is warning teachers to control themselves and be cautious when dealing with their wards.

In addition he is calling on parents to pay more attention to teaching their children good principles, lead by example and “instill their value system in them at a very early age”.

Leacock’s plea comes against the backdrop of recent disputes involving teachers, students and parents.

Just yesterday, a group of parents protested outside St Matthew’s Primary School amid an official visit by Governor General Sir Elliott Belgrave.

The angry placard-bearing parents, who were demanding the immediate removal of principal Barbara Anne Brome-Bailey, charged that the principal was asking children to relay offensive messages to their parents. One guardian also expressed concern about victimization.

In April it was reported that a teacher at the Ellerslie Secondary School was forced to seek medical attention after a female student reportedly spat on her and kicked her in her vagina. Before that, a Springer Memorial School student and her parent became embroiled in controversy with the principal of that institution over the child’s apparent refusal to pick up an empty sweetie wrapper from the ground.

“With reference to the incidents in schools, teachers should control themselves and make sure they always act professionally, because students themselves are dealing with serious issues – social, emotional psychological – and therefore they need to be helped and given the guidance that is necessary,” Leacock said.

He suggested that one of the best ways for teachers to do this was to lead by example.

“There are many students who are coming to school very depressed and they manifest their depression in a variety of ways, including aggression. Some of them may be hurting or angry, and anger turned inward is depression and the anger turned outward is going to be aggression. So, in a physical way, teachers need to be cautious and to guard themselves against any attacks from students even from themselves being embarrassed,” cautioned Leacock.

As for parents, the Daryll Jordan Secondary School guidance counsellor told Barbados TODAY children mirrored their behaviour and personality and therefore it was critical that they set the right example.

“Sometimes the only idea that people have about parental training [and] parental example is through the behaviour and attitude of children. Therefore, parents should make sure that they remotely control the children’s behaviour by instilling their value system and their expectations to children early, so that they will know that even when they are at school the parental expectations of them are high and the consequences will definitely be regrettable,” Leacock said.

In relation to the ongoing dispute involving the Barbados Union of Teachers (BUT) and the Ministry of Education over a decision by the ministry to dock teacher’s pay, the educator said he was not in a position to comment.

However, he told Barbados TODAY “I guess the ministry and the unions will have to work it out, but that is something I know teachers would be concerned about, especially if they are exercising their civil right”.

4 Responses to Leacock: Teachers and parents must lead by example

  1. Joan Wickham
    Joan Wickham June 3, 2016 at 6:57 am

    this advice should be given to the minister of education, who has no diplomacy in dealing with ppl, it starts first with the head, the head is the MOE, if they do not fix the many issues, the teachers would be frustrated, which in turn they will take it out on the student, then the student will act out which will effect the parent, it is a domino effect, if the head is bad, the whole bad becomes bad/that is the problem with b’dos has a whole

    Reply
  2. Tony Waterman June 3, 2016 at 12:38 pm

    @President of the Barbados Association of Guidance Counsellors (BAGC) Saul Leacock!!!! So what should be done When/If the Parent/Caregiver has NO good principles,Is incapable of leading by example and “has NO value system to instill in their Charges at an very early age”.!!!! it seems to me that as President of the Barbados Association of Guidance Counsellors (BAGC) a Professional you should be offering up an alternative plan, instead of being Captain Obvious.

    Your Quote!!!“With reference to the incidents in schools, teachers should control themselves and make sure they always act professionally, because students themselves are dealing with serious issues – social, emotional psychological – and therefore they need to be helped and given the guidance that is necessary,” eacock said. ::End QuoteL””

    Again Sir!!! are you then saying the ALL Teachers are Super Humans, and therefore do or should have issues of their own to deal with ??

    On the Teacher Pay Issue you said “”That is something I know teachers would be concerned about, “””especially if they are exercising their civil right”””. are we to assume that the Ministry/Government has NO Civil Rights, to NOT pay Workers for work that they DID NOT COMPLETE/DO ?? as far as i am aware the Ministry also has written Rules that should be and were NOT Followed.

    Reply
  3. maxjustina June 3, 2016 at 1:04 pm

    Saul has turned a bit of his attention to the role of the teachers. I want also to add: many teachers have not been called by Yahoveh the most High. Many of them who had spent sums of money to acquire higher learning within universities would not have been contented to sit in offices in the capacity of Clerical Officer or Senior Personnel Officer, while allowing the acquired knowledge to remain unused while losing its shelf life with each passing day. With such in mind, they no doubt, would have been advised to “go into teaching” so that they would be paid for their degree-level of education. In other words, no matter what you study at UWI or any other university, as long as you enter the teaching profession, you will be paid a “hefty” salary – not the pittance that is handed out to Clerical Officers. Here lies the problem.

    Too many teachers are not teachers by virtue of the time that they were born. Each person was born with a particular profession in consonant with the timing of their birth. Be that as it may, they just try to get through each day and hope that their students would show eventually some evidence that they have been taught something no matter how little. At times, they are those who cannot tolerate children for one reason or another but they still enter the teaching arena. How would this category of teachers be successful in working with children who are challenged in so many ways that include Drug use, sexual exploitation, underfed, angry, neglected, unloved, mentally challenged at times, defiant? The teachers may be of the belief that you have to “fight fire with fire”. That is not the answer. Some teachers need to turn into themselves and come to that place where they can begin to love themselves and ten try to extend that love outside of them self to all and sundry where possible.

    A known Headmaster of a Barbadian school once stated:

    The material in a Carpenter’s worship is wood
    The material in a Mason’s workshop is mortar, but
    The material in the Teacher’s workshop, IS THE LIVES OF MEN AND WOMEN!!!!!!!!

    Our today’s children and expected to be the adults of tomorrow – the future “strict guardians of our [Barbadian] heritage”.

    Reply
  4. Angela Maria
    Angela Maria June 3, 2016 at 6:16 pm

    Joan Collymore, Theomar Griffith, Cheryl Springer Lol, Leacock boy…..

    Reply

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