28 football coaches upgrade their skills

It was an historic occasion for Barbados’ football when 28 coaches who participated in the CONCACAF C Licence coaching course and were yesterday recognized during a closing ceremony held at the Barbados Football Association (BFA) headquarters, Wildey, St Michael.

This is the first time the course has taken place in Barbados and Jonathan Martinez who is in charge of the curriculum and licensing department at CONCACAF praised both the BFA technical team for what he described as world-class administration and then the coaches for their dedication towards the course that lasted eight days.

(From left) Jonathan Martinez of CONCACAF looks on while Renaldo Gilkes, the new chairman of the BFA Youth Committee, receives his certificate of recognition from CONCACAF Instructor Lenny Lake.
(From left) Jonathan Martinez of CONCACAF looks on while Renaldo Gilkes, the new chairman of the BFA Youth Committee, receives his certificate of recognition from CONCACAF Instructor Lenny Lake.

“This has been truly world class. If the pen drops they catch it and I can’t say enough about how smoothly the course has run. I think the instructors can attest to that and most importantly the coaches did such a great job. I will be one hundred percent honest with you –– one of the concerns we had was starting the course with thirty participants and finishing with fifteen but every single face that I have seen for the most part for the past eight days is here and that is a testament to your dedication to the programme and to your coaching education and what you guys believe in… Go out and spread the knowledge. If it [information] stays here [in the room] it dies here,” Martinez encouraged the participants that included 27 males and national player Kerry Trotman.

Kerry Trotman (left) the lone female participant presented the only female instructor Heather Dyche with a token of appreciaton. (Pictures by Morissa Lindsay)
Kerry Trotman (left) the lone female participant presented the only female instructor Heather Dyche with a token of appreciaton. (Pictures by Morissa Lindsay)

Speaking on behalf of the BFA, vice president Captain Al Walcott congratulated the coaches and told them that from his observations he saw camaraderie, commitment and teamwork and those were three qualities they needed to take forward into their clubs, schools or wherever they go. He added the BFA intended to continue its development of coaching education first with the D licence course that had 76 participants last year and now with the C. But at the same time he made it clear to the coaches that they must play their part by setting themselves high standards.

“I feel that you should maintain those types of characteristic traits because a licensed, qualified doctor does not seek medical advice from a licensed accountant. So if we have a licence in coaching football then we need to bounce our ideas or concerns on licensed coaches. So you need to keep this camaraderie amongst yourself and as you were told keep honing your skills. Set high standards and seek to bring others up to your standards. Don’t lower your standards and things you would have learnt here as coaches to suit players but maintain you standards to ensure the players regardless of how good they are come up to the standard that you would have set. And having set a standard it requires that you continue reading, studying, honing your skills and that you continue to raise the bar because if you stay stagnant then others come to you and you have nothing extra that you can give to them,” Walcott explained.

Another CONCACAF instructor, Lenny Lake, said it was easy for them to find excuses in their capacities but pointed out that if they were passionate about something then they should not be afraid to try it.

Lake said: “The people who fail are the people who don’t try; the people who fail are those who try and give up; and the people who win, they continue. As coaches you must know where the knowledge is and sometimes it is not in a library, or Internet. Sometimes it is the reality of getting a bunch of children, going to a coach and asking somebody to assess you. That doesn’t mean you are a bad coach, it means you want to get better and be accountable for your standard.”

Trotman the lone female participant told Barbados TODAY it was a great achievement being the first female C licensed coach in Barbados and she intended to use that qualification for the betterment of the sport especially with female football.

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