Lord Nelson statue must go, says Pan Africanist

As Barbados celebrates National Heroes Day, there are renewed calls for the removal of Lord Nelson’s statue from its prominent place in National Heroes Square, The City.

Secretary of the Pan-African Coalition of Organizations, David Denny, made this appeal while addressing a small group gathered at the statue of Bussa at Haggatt Hall, St Michael this morning to recognize the contributions made by General Bussa and Nanny Greg to the liberation of Afro- Barbadians.

 

Cuba’s Ambassador to Barbados, Francisco Pena and Venezuela’s Ambassador to Barbados, Jose Gomez, lay flowers at the feet of General Bussa.

Terming the presence of the statue of Lord Nelson in National Heroes Square as an insult to all those who fought for the destruction of the institution of slavery in Barbados, Denny argued that it shows that Barbadians do not understand their history.

The longstanding Pan-Africanist pointed out that Lord Nelson fought for the retention of the institution of slavery in the British Empire.

Denny however lauded the scholarly research done by Sir Hilary Beckles which showed that General Bussa was the undisputed leader of the 1816 Rebellion which began at Bayley’s Plantation in St Philip.

_DSC0019

He also identified late historian, Leroy Harewood, Rickey Parris, Glenroy Straughn, Clement Payne, Israel Lovell, Tony Cheeseman, and David Comissiong among others for their significant contributions to the liberation of Afro-Barbadians.

Denny further praised the government of Venezuela which recently dedicated a part of its cultural centre at Rockley, Christ Church to the memory of General Bussa.

 

_DSC0013

Meanwhile, in an equally brief presentation, Pan-Africanist, Baba John Howell, paid homage to all freedom fighters that fought for the liberation of Blacks who at one stage of their history built great civilizations in Africa and around the world.

 

90 Responses to Lord Nelson statue must go, says Pan Africanist

  1. Veroniva Boyce
    Veroniva Boyce April 28, 2016 at 1:42 pm

    What for? Now why burden wunna selves with more cost to move it. Focus on the QEH do!

    Reply
  2. Julian Marshall
    Julian Marshall April 28, 2016 at 1:43 pm

    Since Queen Elizabeth is head of state unfortunately they can’t move him just like that but he really does need to go.he did absolutely nothing for this country.he didn’t even like Barbados and was all for slavery.he barely want bulldozing from Broad street

    Reply
    • Marc Goodridge
      Marc Goodridge April 28, 2016 at 8:30 pm

      The Queen being the head of state has NOTHING to do with our ability to remove Nelson.

      Reply
    • Julian Marshall
      Julian Marshall April 29, 2016 at 4:43 am

      Well whether or not that’s the case he still want tekin down

      Reply
  3. Lynn Lucas
    Lynn Lucas April 28, 2016 at 1:44 pm

    Stupeese…

    Reply
  4. Mark Fenty
    Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 2:23 pm

    Leave the statue of Lord Nelson exactly where it belongs because it is indelible to the Barbadian cultural ethos, as flying fish and cou cou is to our culinary tradition.

    Reply
    • Jacob Donawa
      Jacob Donawa April 28, 2016 at 2:36 pm

      How much nazi’s have statues in isreal? The african holocost was 100x worse than the jewish one. He was a slavemaster who fully supported slavery and oppression of black people. #facts

      Reply
    • Olutoye Walrond April 28, 2016 at 2:39 pm

      Mark, what do you mean by saying the Nelson statue “is INDELIBLE to the Barbadian cultural ethos”?

      Reply
    • Adrian M Chase
      Adrian M Chase April 28, 2016 at 2:41 pm

      So was slavery Mark. We need to just push it into the sea, fitting resting place.
      Didn’t a slave owner/demon now get his picture replaced on the $20 bill in the US?
      He was a president too…lol.

      Reply
    • Adrian M Chase
      Adrian M Chase April 28, 2016 at 2:42 pm

      I agree with you Jacob.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 2:43 pm

      Ok…and many of the early American presidents were slave owners whose faces are now on the American curreny, but you don’t flush it down the toilet everything you get it right?

      Reply
    • Adrian M Chase
      Adrian M Chase April 28, 2016 at 2:48 pm

      Conversely, you should not make a fuss when such a symbol is removed either.

      Reply
    • Buddy Love
      Buddy Love April 28, 2016 at 2:57 pm

      Mark.You need to either wake up or live in Saudi Arabia where your ignorance of your history will be whipped into you

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 2:59 pm

      Adrian M Chase, President Abraham Lincoln was a bigot of the worse sort in his earlier years as a lawyer representing the slave master against the run away slave, but he was also instrument in bring that evil institution to an end which evidently cost him his life.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:02 pm

      President Harry Truman was a member of the KKK as a young man, but he was the first president to reintegrated the military because the US military was integrated during the War of Independence, but shortly after the war Congress passed a law making white males fit for military service only.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:06 pm

      Buddy Love, believe it or not I have pretty good grasp of European, African, African American, South American, Native American and West Indian history.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:06 pm

      Buddy Love, believe it or not I have a pretty good grasp of European, African, African American, South American, Native American and West Indian history.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:09 pm

      Buddy Love, let me shock you with this historical fact: are you aware of the fact that free African Americans owned slaves?

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:12 pm

      Buddy Love, are you aware of the fact that the five civilized Native American tribes owned slaves?

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:17 pm

      Buddy Love, are you aware of the fact that the native white Barbadian transported the plantocracy to South Carolina and introduced chattel slavery on the continent in the 1600s?

      Reply
    • Jacob Donawa
      Jacob Donawa April 28, 2016 at 3:22 pm

      And how is any of that information relevant? How does any of that justify glorifying and keeping a statue of a racist who was proslavery in a mostly black country.?

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:33 pm

      Buddy Love, white indentured servants suffered the similar fate as they enslaved black counterparts working the cotton and tobacco plantations prior to the introduction of sugar cane, which brought African slavery to the Caribbean.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:33 pm

      Buddy Love, white indentured servants suffered the similar fate as they enslaved black counterparts who worked the cotton and tobacco plantations prior to the introduction of sugar cane, which brought African slavery to the Caribbean. And what a lot of people fail to grasp about white indentured servitude is the fact that the white indentured servant, continually violated to terms of his contract and was forever indebted to the plantation owner.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 3:47 pm

      Jacob Donawa, it is relevant because the remanence of our enslavement as an African people are part and parcel of our identity, as much as the people who enslaved us, no matter how painful it may appear. Then how do we rid our blood of the European gene? It is a constant reminder of our enslavement more so than the statue which stands in Bridgetown.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 4:23 pm

      Lol

      Reply
    • Adrian M Chase
      Adrian M Chase April 28, 2016 at 4:23 pm

      Show of hands for who would miss the statue.

      Reply
    • Adrian M Chase
      Adrian M Chase April 28, 2016 at 4:30 pm

      Mark Fenty ..and with all this American history, tell me what the broken chains at the feet of the statue of Liberty represents.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 4:31 pm

      Ed Sealy, I love Marx X militancy in the juggernaut of American institutional racism. His mother was West Indian were you aware of that fact?

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 4:46 pm

      Jocab, Emanual Kant preached a racist and an anti-semitic philosophy, but he is still regarded as the leading moralist philosopher in the western intellectual tradition. And his philosophical moral precepts are taught throughout the Caribbean and in many parts of North America, Europe and the African continent. It is funny, you’re fretting over an idle statue when we have the philosophy of a knows racist Pagan philosopher influencing the thinking of generations of young black West Indians.

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 4:56 pm

      Andrian M Chase, I don’t get it because in what way would having a knowledge of the representation of broken chains at the feet of the Statue of Liberty, change the trajectory of this discussion in any meaningful way?

      Reply
    • Mark Fenty
      Mark Fenty April 28, 2016 at 5:41 pm

      Anna Bovell, well, I am not going to argue senseless with you because if that’s what your history books tell you, then run with that version.

      Reply
  5. Patricia V. Gaskin
    Patricia V. Gaskin April 28, 2016 at 2:47 pm

    Every damn year the same vomit… Stupes

    Reply
  6. Annetta Paul
    Annetta Paul April 28, 2016 at 2:56 pm

    What would they like to replace him with?

    Reply
  7. jrsmith April 28, 2016 at 2:57 pm

    Denny seems to be the only person who understands Barbados history… what history is he on about, flying fish , sea eggs , sweet bread , pig tails that’s the trouble with him and his group that’s why 1% of the people in Barbados own all the wealth black history has only worked in favour of the white man past history and is still in favour of them today..

    What is wrong with lord Nelson, he played no part in hunting black people in the jungles of Africa and selling them on to the white man as slaves. that was done by the jungle chiefs and Elders…

    You want Nelson remove fine, but you replace him with our black Jesus…(NELSON MANDELA) Then you go to all the churches on the Island remove the pictures of white Jesus and replace them with ( Nelson Mandela) I dare you. Mr,Denny dressing as police man doesn’t make you a policeman…

    Reply
  8. Anderson Allman
    Anderson Allman April 28, 2016 at 2:59 pm

    The dlp government under sandy paid $750000 to turn its direction whoever want to remove it let them foot the bill

    Reply
  9. Cheryl A Rollins
    Cheryl A Rollins April 28, 2016 at 3:02 pm

    Lord Nelson is the least of our worries. Remove the current administration.

    Reply
    • Anthony Michael Hinds
      Anthony Michael Hinds April 28, 2016 at 5:56 pm

      Straight shot !.

      Reply
    • Cheryl A Rollins
      Cheryl A Rollins April 28, 2016 at 6:13 pm

      Lord Nelson is not a threat all he does is gaze up Broad Street. These goons on the other hand has thrown us into the poor house.

      Reply
  10. Gloria Mendes April 28, 2016 at 3:04 pm

    You can’t change history. Removing a statue won’t do that either but it will cost us in the long run.
    Our statue of lord Nelson is the oldest in the world
    Have you seen the amount of British tourist who go take pictures of it and with it. We need tourism. The statue is helping us not hurting us. Find some other thing to fuss about.

    Reply
  11. Annie Swalef
    Annie Swalef April 28, 2016 at 3:11 pm

    And it sud not be forgotten mi seh

    Reply
  12. Himmel Klar
    Himmel Klar April 28, 2016 at 4:03 pm

    If you are going to embrace one kind of history all of the history has to be told. The statue is there it is apart of history so no need to remove it.

    Reply
    • Danielle Reid-Melillo
      Danielle Reid-Melillo April 28, 2016 at 5:09 pm

      So you want to embrace a slave master in our hero’s square?? Is he some sort of hero?

      Reply
    • Himmel Klar
      Himmel Klar April 28, 2016 at 5:15 pm

      Danielle be realistic. Barbados was a colony it is written that it had slaves. What is embracing that. It was part of history, the statue was there way before I was born or even my parents read what I said and not take it as embracing slavery. As always you are in titled to your opinion as do I.

      Reply
    • Robert Holloway
      Robert Holloway April 28, 2016 at 7:20 pm

      Problem with history by rewriting it due one outcry , by the time we finished with all the outcrys over the years , one will not know the real history. If you visit Nelsons Dockyard in Antiqua , will someone revolt on that also,

      Reply
  13. René Holder
    René Holder April 28, 2016 at 4:23 pm

    Erasing our history benefits no one. The statue is put there by Barbadians and speaks to a period of our journey as a people.

    Reply
  14. Philip Matthews
    Philip Matthews April 28, 2016 at 4:31 pm

    If it was not for Nelson there would be no English Speaking Caribbean Island , he lost his life in a Battle to protect the English Empire That Barbados was A jewel in the Empires crown , to get rid of our English history to prove what ? Stop Playing Cricket then

    Reply
  15. Safiya Kamaria Kinshasa
    Safiya Kamaria Kinshasa April 28, 2016 at 5:00 pm

    So let me get this straight… Pan Africanists’ biggest threat to Barbados and the “cultural pride” agenda is Lord Nelson’s statue? Wait wait wait wait wait wait wait wait wait wait

    Reply
  16. Ezekiel Baker
    Ezekiel Baker April 28, 2016 at 5:04 pm

    Why don all you black bajan people return to Africa, surly it would resolve all your problem.

    Reply
    • Danielle Reid-Melillo
      Danielle Reid-Melillo April 28, 2016 at 5:12 pm

      Why should we return to Africa when some of our ancestors were brought there to work for nothing? The land is rightfully ours since they weren’t paid. The slave master statue must go. It’s an eye sore

      Reply
  17. Danielle Reid-Melillo
    Danielle Reid-Melillo April 28, 2016 at 5:15 pm

    Yes take him down and replace him with a statue of Erroll Barrow! He is not a hero in any way! Should have been removed a long time ago. We are so silly and backwards to have a statue of him around.

    Reply
  18. ch April 28, 2016 at 5:16 pm

    There are malcontents who fail to understand that Lord Nelson and slavery are both part of our history and history cannot be changed.
    How long was slavery abolished as a social and legal institution?
    How is a statue of Nelson in Bridgetown the problem of the Barbadian today?
    The problem is mental slavery – refusing to take responsibility for our own destiny because it is easier to blame everyone and everything else. Because so-called educated persons feed the myth that we deserve a hand-out just for being black.
    Is a large percentage of our youth illiterate and unproductive because of Lord Nelson?
    Is our prison over- populated because of Nelson?
    Are our children experiencing staggering levels of abuse and pedophilia because of Nelson?
    Are our families in financial crisis because of Nelson?
    If you take down the statue of Nelson, turn it upside-down and plant it in the ground, that will not correct these urgent, current problems of our country.
    That will not build a future for our young people.
    When your focus on slavery and black history is nothing but a mask for racism and division, it is the ultimate disrespect to a people who were stripped of their very humanity because of racism.

    Reply
  19. Winston Gittens
    Winston Gittens April 28, 2016 at 5:46 pm

    The same way they moved Sir Garfield Sobers statue.. Move nelson statue to the museum..

    Reply
  20. Anthony Michael Hinds
    Anthony Michael Hinds April 28, 2016 at 5:55 pm

    Soon we as an island will have no history and /or identity as a people if this keeps up.

    Reply
  21. Rusty Ralph
    Rusty Ralph April 28, 2016 at 6:00 pm

    Every year like clockwork…Common Entrance gotta go,,,Nelson gotta go,,, Some of these people mouth want duct tape. It is idiotic. They must change everything they born and find.

    Reply
  22. Joel C. Payne
    Joel C. Payne April 28, 2016 at 6:03 pm

    Same old toutoulbay…. Does the Parliament need to go too because it supported slavery? Then we can have Parliament sitting on some big rocks pun the side of the Careenage.

    Reply
  23. Joel C. Payne
    Joel C. Payne April 28, 2016 at 6:12 pm

    Lets play musical chairs with all de statues. Move the Grantley Adams Statue from infront Cabinet office and move it to the main central area of the Airport. Move the Errol Barrow Statute from Independence Square and put it in Errol Barrow Park in de Pine… Move Mendela statute and put it in Johennesburg… Move the Lord Nelson and put it in London to help boost London’s tourism. Or as I heard some in Antigua might take it for English Habour to make their Nelson dock area more complete. The added history of the statue at that point would give a little flare for Antigua when they tell the story that the statue was evicted out of Barbados and sailed to Antigua. Are Pan Africanists really this touchous and simply entertained?

    Reply
  24. Samud Ali
    Samud Ali April 28, 2016 at 6:14 pm

    The lack of cohesive creative thinking when it comes to the fine balance of culture and history is appalling and should not be in the hands of anyone or anything connected to politics. There IS a happy marriage between the history of colonialism and that of present day Barbados. Barrow is a rock pelt away from Nelson, the story of our very being as a country is being played out right there in Bridgetown daily yet instead of embracing a real creative and I dare say, financially viable way of capitalizing on our true history, we have a bunch ever so often popping out of some kind of woodwork calling for drastic changes to history but no calls for drastic changes to fix present day problems. Our future must not be fooled into believing that Barbados history started in 1966…. That just creates a society limited in its ability to embrace the pain of our fore parents and use it as fuel to forge a brighter tomorrow. Nelson is not the only reminder of colonialism, parliament is too… soooooo…

    Reply
  25. Robert Holloway
    Robert Holloway April 28, 2016 at 7:29 pm

    Seems this was also a discussion yesterday ” Addressing a panel discussion of the Barbados Museum and Historical Society last night”

    Reply
  26. Loretta Griffith April 28, 2016 at 8:04 pm

    History will always be history. Even though some try to distort it, history will be history, just like facts and truth.
    Please stop distorting both and stick to the relevance of the topic.

    Reply
  27. Sheldine Dyall
    Sheldine Dyall April 28, 2016 at 9:06 pm

    People suffering and all the time you asking to remove a statue

    Reply
  28. bajan April 28, 2016 at 10:26 pm

    I think the statue should stay. We can put up as much monuments as we want, we can laud as much National Heroes as have risen, it is blatantly obvious that none of these has done anything about the way we see and treat our fellow negros. Even if we push Nelson statue into the sea we still wouldn’t look and emulate the already established heroes among us. As much as we would like to think otherwise Barbados was/is British and Lord Nelson is part of this country’s history.

    Reply
  29. Andrew Streat
    Andrew Streat April 28, 2016 at 11:20 pm

    History is history and Lord Nelson is part of history. We cannot just have half the story. Both statues have a place and both should remain where they are.

    Reply
  30. Adrian Reid
    Adrian Reid April 28, 2016 at 11:55 pm

    He was a theif trow it in the sea

    Reply
  31. jrsmith April 29, 2016 at 4:43 am

    Who is going to be honest, what this Nelson issue is all about, slavery, history or being a white man.. slavery benefitted the white man and is still doing so today, so call black history again benefitted the white man. the white own the worlds wealth, at least we have some one to blame for our failings ,the politicians in Barbados is loving this, detracting from the real problems…

    Reply
  32. Derek Gale April 29, 2016 at 6:13 am

    So with Barbados celebrating National Heroes Day, there now appears to be renewed calls for the removal of the statue of Lord Nelson from its prominent place in National Heroes Square, Bridgetown and the capital of Barbados. Not to mention, when the Barbados Government wants Barbados to become a republic and not have Queen Elizabeth 11 has the Queen of Barbados. This is what the Secretary of the Pan-African Coalition of Organizations, David Denny, who made this appeal while addressing a small group who gathered around the statue of Bussa at Haggatt Hall, St Michael during the past couple days to recognize the contributions made by General Bussa and Nanny Greg to the liberation of Afro- Barbadians. The question is why should the Pan-African Coalition of Organizations remove principal statue of this British naval officer Lord Nelson, when this champion of the then British Empire played a pivotal part in protecting and defending the British colonies like Barbados from the other European counties during that period of extraordinary history and by removing Lord Nelson statue Barbados would be amending and expunging chronological specifics about Barbados during the sequential epoch as a British colony and the British empire

    Reply
  33. Derek Gale
    Derek Gale April 29, 2016 at 6:17 am

    So with Barbados celebrating National Heroes Day, there now appears to be renewed calls for the removal of the statue of Lord Nelson from its prominent place in National Heroes Square, Bridgetown and the capital of Barbados. Not to mention, when the Barbados Government wants Barbados to become a republic and not have Queen Elizabeth 11 has the Queen of Barbados. This is what the Secretary of the Pan-African Coalition of Organizations, David Denny, who made this appeal while addressing a small group who gathered around the statue of Bussa at Haggatt Hall, St Michael during the past couple days to recognize the contributions made by General Bussa and Nanny Greg to the liberation of Afro- Barbadians. The question is why should the Pan-African Coalition of Organizations remove principal statue of this British naval officer Lord Nelson, when this champion of the then British Empire played a pivotal part in protecting and defending the British colonies like Barbados from the other European counties during that period of extraordinary history and by removing Lord Nelson statue Barbados would be amending and expunging chronological specifics about Barbados during the sequential epoch as a British colony and the British empire.

    Reply
  34. BaJan boy April 29, 2016 at 7:38 am

    Wish you guys would lend your voices to more significant matters affecting our people. I can pass up Broad street ten times a day and won’t see him nor would it affect me. What does are the starving children of our country,the homeless men and women the crime espesially those com item by juveniles,the regression of our country by an unintelligent administration,the decline in social services,the lack of educational opportunities at tertiary level,the decline in health care and the poor state of our health institutions,the poor sanitation services,the people in the northe who are suffering for water,the poor services from the child care board.
    In fact we can take down Nelson and put up a statue of Frundel Stuart on the pinnacle of Paliament where the clock is. Bajans full of shit..

    Reply
  35. Vince April 29, 2016 at 7:41 am

    There is a world of difference in the experiences of the perpetrators of slavery and the victims of slavery. If you only know history from the perspective of the enslavers rather than from that of the victims, then you would not be able to appreciate why it would be appropriate, in a country where the overwhelming majority of citizens are descendants of enslaved Africans, to have a statute of Bussa but not of Nelson. Nelson represents the institution of slavery brutally enforced on our ancestors; Bussa the struggle our fore-parents waged against that institution.
    Whilst there are other issues with which the Barbados government and people have to address, this is also a legitimate one. It is absolute foolishness to suggest that addressing this issue is somehow evidence of mental slavery and an abdication of our responsibilities to try to build a better future for our children in a world in which racism and denial of opportunity to black people and poor people are everyday aspects of life.

    Reply
  36. Celestine Duke
    Celestine Duke April 29, 2016 at 10:11 am

    Oh David for God’s sake David leave the statue where it is this country has bigger problems help deal with them sheesh!!

    Reply
  37. F.A.Rudder April 29, 2016 at 11:17 am

    OK so lets start with making the chief African languages spoken; our official language and have them made compulsory at secondary level education. If our youth are in for it then let it fly. Smartphones do a great job today for the limited educated so i don”t think it should be a hard thing to do. Just before I go i would like to thank Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson for affording us in Barbados the privilege to speak and write English language in times past, as it was very beneficial in allowing Barbadians to access Quality education throughout the World. Sweeping History under the carpet is the same as distorting the laws of a land. Future generations will have distorted literacy of their culture. Now if one’s saying slavery benefited the white man; it also true for the Black Egyptian man. I think we should be literate enough to have studied History or even read the bible, one type of slavery i detest is mental slavery that is the most degrading of them all!

    Reply
  38. Ossie Moore April 29, 2016 at 11:31 am

    Ossie Moore wants to know if the Pan Africans know that ashes from a special shrub was suposed to be rubbed on face and hands for such occasions as laying of the wreath of a hero?

    Reply
  39. James Franks April 29, 2016 at 1:16 pm

    Get real guys, Nelson was a great hero that prevented a French invasion of Barbados and his statue should be remain in place.

    Time to move on.

    Reply
  40. Tee White April 29, 2016 at 3:27 pm

    Reading the posts on this forum has convinced me how spot on Prime Minister Freundel Stuart was in his independence address last year when he said that we will not completely decolonise our country until we decolonise our minds.

    It is mind boggling to see the descendants of slaves coming on this forum and posting the most outlandish and nonsensical justifications for our country to continue to honour the life and work of an individual who dedicated himself to the defence of the British Empire and its slavery system. Some have defended the British empire which was one of the most cruel and criminal institutions established in human history, based as it was on racism and crimes against humanity on practically every continent. As is known, Hitler was a great fan of it. Others have even gone so far as to question whether Nelson was a racist, despite him having dedicated his whole life to the defence of a racist system. I guess next they will post questions as to whether there is any evidence that Hitler persecuted Jews. No one is claiming that removing Nelson’s offensive statue is the most pressing issue facing Barbados or will some how fix the problems we are facing. Taking down his statue will not change history as you can’t change the past. Nelson will remain known as a defender of Britain’s racist empire and its slavery system. What it would do, however, is make a statement about who we honour from our country’s past by maintaining a statue of them.

    As others have said, its removal does not need to be expensive. We could bulldoze it down and drop it in the sea or if some other country wants to buy it we could sell it to them and make a few dollars. We could replace it with a statue to the unknown rebel slave or to the women who have contributed so much to our country’s progress. Anyway we could use the space to honour those who made so many sacrifices, including sometimes paying the ultimate price, so that we could live today without the chains on our feet, even if some of us still have them firmly in place on our minds.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *