No water ease

The already troublesome water shortages in the north and east of the island are likely to get worse before they get better.

Manager of Engineering at the Barbados Water Authority (BWA) Charles Marville said last night that there was likely to be even less fresh water available in the near future because of rising salt levels in some west coast wells.

From left, water professional Charles Leslie, moderator Peter Earle and Manager of Engineering at the BWA Charles Marville.
From left, water professional Charles Leslie, moderator Peter Earle and Manager of Engineering at the BWA Charles Marville.

Speaking to Barbados TODAY following a town hall meeting at the Westmoreland Church of the Nazarene, Marville said Barbadians should prepare for the long haul.

“We are seeing now the wells on the west coast getting progressively saltier and we are going to have to cut back on them gradually . . . . It’s going to be a little longer haul than we anticipated because remember the water that we are pumping now would have fallen last year and we had no [rain] in the latter part of last year up to now. So even if [rain] fell now, it would still be a while before it relieves the problem. So we are going to be in this position for a lot longer,” Marville explained.

To complicate matters, the BWA executive explained that the water company was experiencing “a major shortage of tankers” but that eight had been ordered and were due to begin arriving by June.

In the meantime, Marville appealed to Barbadians to limit their use of water to help ease the problem.

“I would like us to be conscious of the water we are wasting – not use of water but how we use it. If we are conscious of the water we would use it wisely.

“Be conscious of the water running all the time, we should cut it out. A number of people have started to do it but I would like it to catch on more. As a country, per capita, we use a lot of water and we need to be using less. I’m of the view that the opportunity is there to reduce the amount of water we are using so we have enough to go around,” he said.

During the town hall meeting residents complained that the BWA had been doing a poor job communicating with consumers.

Marville told Barbados TODAY the company had been trying its best and would continue to do all it could to update residents and respond to their calls in a timelier manner.

“We are doing town hall meetings, we are doing call-in programmes, things with DEOs [district emergency organizations] all over the island. There are some things we can’t fix in terms of letting you know. If a main burst and we are not aware we can’t do anything about it but if there are planned outages, we do let our customers know. We broadcast it over the media. What we are trying to do now is expand that and do it via social media,” he said. 

A resident giving her take on bad experiences with BWA.
A resident giving her take on bad experiences with BWA.
Some of the residents of St James and St Thomas who came out to the town hall meeting.
Some of the residents of St James and St Thomas who came out to the town hall meeting.

 

One Response to No water ease

  1. FE DRAKE September 13, 2016 at 10:06 am

    What are you doing about installing desalination plants? You have been warned about this situation for years.

    Why are you waiting until the situation is becoming unbearable for some Barbadian residents to “kindly request” people to moderate their use of water.

    There was a recent Bajan production on FB where many “ladies” claimed that they luxuriate in baths for 30 minutes. In the precincts of St. Michael and Ch. Ch. When confronted the cursed and made it very clear they don’t give two hoots.

    Why are Bajans in the North having to pay the price for Bajans in the south who look down on the northern areas of Barbados. Are we not supposed to be ONE country. Celebrating our 50th Anniversary of Independence? With what? Water shortages worse than before we became independent.

    Why don’t you use some progressive and aggressive measures? Like Puerto Rico? Have a revolving service to every parrish. Two parrishes per day get water and then revolve it again. Advertise it so that people will be aware. WAKE UP. You will soon lose the Tourist Trade. Then you will not only have water woes. You will have financial woes.l

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *