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Honychurch: Trees unlikely to be the source of Combermere issues

Anthropologist Dr Lennox Honychurch has expressed surprise over the reason given by Principal Vere Parris for the recent closure of Combermere School.

The principal has suggested that nearby trees are at the root of the school’s environmental problems, which forced him to call off classes on at least two occasions over the past two months.

However, in response to this suggestion, Dr Honychurch has pointed out to Barbados TODAY that the suspected trees have been present from the time the Waterford school was first occupied in September 1958.

The Dominica-born Honychurch, who recently served as head of the Barbados National Trust, also suggested that even though the trees were known to exude a scent that could be considered “unpleasant for people” in the process of pollination, it was unlikely that they were the source of Combermere’s problems.

Honychurch, who first expressed his position on the issue during a programme carried on state-owned television last night, further suggested to Barbados TODAY that the real problem may exist within the confines of the school’s compound.

President of the Barbados Secondary Teachers Union Mary Redman has suggested that if the trees are the source of the problem, then they should be cut down.

However, Anglican cleric Reverend Charles Morris, who heads up the school’s History Department, has argued that each time a problem is reported at the school a different reason was given.

“They said it was the wells, they said it was sewerage, they said it was grease traps and now they are saying it’s because of trees . . . there are too many inconsistencies,” complained Morris, who has been teaching there for the past 34 years.

“You cannot tell me that over a two-year period every time something breaks out it is a different reason,” he recently told Barbados TODAY. (MCW)

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