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Sinckler wary of critical surveys

Barbados would earn a “platinum medal” should there be a prize for bureaucracy, still Barbadians must be cautious about surveys that give the island a less than favourable score as it relates to the ease of doing business, Minister of Finance Chris Sinckler has warned.

Sinckler admitted that the country had “a rich history” of bureaucracy, but advised that some of the surveys ought to be viewed with a hint of suspicion because of uncertainty over who conducted them or the methodology.

Addressing the Week of Excellence 2016 seminar yesterday at the Grande Salle of the Central Bank, the bank’s Governor Dr DeLisle Worrell expressed concern about the country’s ranking in the area of labour productivity and the impact on the ease of doing business.

Worrell argued that while the island had made some progress in becoming competitive, having been ranked 55 in the world and the highest in the English speaking Caribbean in the latest global competitiveness report for 2014/2015, there was still some concern in relation to productivity.

“We have not made commensurate progress in terms of labour productivity. We have seen increases in output for each unit of labour for the past decade, but they have been only sufficient to enable us to maintain our standings in the late 40s and early 50s out of a score of 100 in the competitive ranking in the report I mentioned,” said Worrell.

“Faster growth in productivity of our labour force is necessary if we are to further improve our relative competitiveness. Increasing labour productivity is also essential to improving the living standards of our workforce.”

The senior economist said it was an issue everyone should work to resolve, adding that the problem was “especially acute” in the public service.

“In the global competitiveness report the inefficiency in our Government bureaucracy is identified as the most damaging factor for doing business in Barbados,” said Worrell.

However, Sinckler warned that “we have to be extremely careful when we enlist these generalized assumptions based by whomever, designed by whomever and concluded by whomever about the inherent, either implicit or as some people say explicit negatives of bureaucracy in Barbados”.

He said while he was not defending public sector workers, those who complained about bureaucracy were often responsible for it.   

“The people who complain most of the inefficiencies of the bureaucracy are the people who create the biggest problems that cause that bureaucracy not to function effectively. And this is not to blame anybody. This is to say that we all have to take responsibility for the system,” the Minister of Finance said.

Sinckler stressed that it was time the country moves away from “anecdotal evidence” and focused on “empirical and factual” information as it relates to efficiency, productivity and competitiveness.

He added that it was critical that the private and public sectors determine the key interventions needed to address the issue of productivity, and develop the relevant systems to achieve the highest levels of efficiency.

President of the Congress of Trade Unions and Staff Associations of Barbados Cedric Murrell also addressed the event and called for a national assessment of the level of productivity on the island.

Murrell urged the National Productivity Council to work with the Central Bank and the Social Partners to organize a national symposium on the impact of the cost of labour and low productivity on doing business here.

“This matter is in need of exploration, exposition and discussion if we are to identify what we have to do to make ourselves competitive in the world of business,” insisted Murrell.

The Week of Excellence is being held under the theme Continuing the Transition: Growing & Sustaining Tomorrow’s Leaders.

6 Responses to Sinckler wary of critical surveys

  1. Shawn Harris
    Shawn Harris February 24, 2016 at 6:06 am

    Do your best love it

  2. Tony Webster February 24, 2016 at 6:35 am

    Talk, talk, talk. Anectdotal talk; factual talk; cautious talk; emprical talk….even “sweet-talk” . Yuh cud talk about a girl all yuh want; yuh cud talk TO a girl all yuh want. Yuh gine spin top in mud till yuh dead…but yuh got to back-up talk…wid action.

    Regrettably, action is out-of-season hereabouts and nowabouts. Is O.T.L. (Out -To- Lunch)…at Jokers Restuarant. No joke.

  3. jrsmith February 24, 2016 at 2:18 pm

    We are so well educated we are educating a bunch of idiots, this is comments , coming from one of the most important government Ministers. of other fools is following suite , the real issue the lazy bajan people , the people who are not qualified to be place in lots of govern post and is only there because they are members of the ruling party.

    You have in Barbados a non productive political infrucsture, too big for such a small island what do all of these people do, a non productive public sector with unqualified people, that’s why the government is needing to use the private sector consultants. doubling up on domestic costing, overall a government with no idea how to manage Barbados LTD.

    We need one of the soca men to make a recording of our politicians, talk talk today, talk talk tomorrow, talk talk to tell we how much they gin borrow ,oh poor bajans some more sorrow waiting on we for tomorrow.

  4. Sunshine Sunny Shine February 24, 2016 at 2:40 pm

    Absolutely ridiculous! Mr. Minister, you should be crowned with an enamel topsy for the type of waste you tend to generate from time to time. It boggles the mind why this administration’s behaviour is ever so low(e) down.

  5. dave February 24, 2016 at 2:41 pm

    Hi jrsmith.
    One of our Soca men has already made a song dealing with Talk and Politicians /others . The Radio Stations need to play it. I can send you a copy.
    The song is by a Great Barbadian Soca artist/Calypsonian named BLACK PAWN- yap yap yap yap –
    Check it out !
    I agree with you and the points you made in your posts. You know things Man -You know things. especially the people who are not qualified to be in the positions they hold. They hold some positions because they have degrees but when it comes to the practical and when it comes to dealing with people as human beings , they are fogging up the Country (another Black Pawn -song) .

  6. Owen Phillips February 24, 2016 at 10:04 pm

    I would like to know who is Tony Webster, do you have a job, do you have a family all you do is spend a lot of unproductive time on this blog you are a empty shell you are empty vessel find another way of being productive. You are a wind bag.Just stay off the blog. Get a job. Make some money and spend it back in your country so that you can be taxed. I am tired of reading your nonsense.


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