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Cocaine to blame

COURT TODAY BLOCKOf the 18 charges which Dane Rene Ellis had against him in the District ‘A’ Magistrates Court, he confessed to 17 with the last one being an indictable matter to which he was unable to plead.

That allegation is that Ellis, 40, handled a stolen car between January 5 and 6 this year, belonging to Simpson Finance Limited. The burglar will return before Magistrate Kristie Cuffy-Sargeant for sentencing on Friday.

Ellis will also go back before Magistrate Christopher Birch in the District ‘C’ Magistrates Court on Thursday to be sentenced for a single offence which he admitted to last week.

That offence relates to the theft of two gold chains and a pendant, valued at $5,400, belonging to Carolyn Fulton, sometime between June 25 and August 4 last year.

The 18 charges relate mainly to burglarizing business houses and homes, including the Black Rock Cultural Centre on two occasions, Pharmacy World, Praise Academy, Braddie’s Bar, The Village Hut, Generation 3 Canteen, Family Gem Supplies, Cricket Legends Bar and Pavilion, Blackwoods Screwdocks Bar, Pure Hand & Foot Spa and Kirk’s Beer Garden.

Apart from the matter related to Fulton, all of the other offences were allegedly carried out between September 2015 and January 27
this year.

In his mitigation, attorney-at-law Mohia Ma’at told the court today that his client is a cocaine addict and had been introduced to the substance “by a young lady”.

He said that he was aware that the court would impose a custodial sentence but hoped that it “would not be one of too great a length”.

Ma’at also apologized on Ellis’ behalf and asked the court to consider that when one uses cocaine, “the neurological response of the brain is to get more” and in this case, Ellis went about getting more by turning to crime.

Ma’at also hoped that the sentence would not only focus on deterring Ellis from any such further actions but help to rehabilitate him as well.

2 Responses to Cocaine to blame

  1. Angela Maria
    Angela Maria February 10, 2016 at 1:39 pm

    She tie he down and stuff um in he nose?

  2. Veroniva Boyce
    Veroniva Boyce February 10, 2016 at 5:03 pm

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