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Clarke ‘the tragic hero . . .’

Trevor “Job” Clarke was a “real Barbadian patriot” who will be missed on the Barbadian landscape, according to political activist David Comissiong.

Trevor “Job” Clarke

Trevor “Job” Clarke

In his tribute to Clarke, who passed away at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital at age 78, Comissiong said: “It is hard to think of a Barbados without Trevor Clarke.

“Trevor Clarke has been a larger-than-life presence in our society for so long, that he is going to be sorely missed. It’s hard to think of one of these public discussions-like lectures without the presence of Trevor Clarke always challenging, asking questions, proposing solutions,” Comissiong told Barbados TODAY.

The Clement Payne Movement president added that Clarke had given much to the development of the country, ranging from being involved in the founding of The Nation newspaper, to the establishment of the Black Business Association, to trying to pioneer business relations for the African continent.

“But sad to say, I think Trevor Clarke also enters the annuls of our history as a tragic hero. Some would even say a martyr to the cause of black economic enfranchisement, because Trevor Clarke was a symbol of the black businessman endued with tremendous entrepreneurial flair, endued with a transcending uplifting vision of business achievement in Barbados,” he explained.

The attorney-at-law added that Clarke’s death posed a very serious question.

“Why have we been content to maintain a society that in a systemic way frustrates and holds back and marginalizes black business and entrepreneurial talent? Why do we allow such a system to persist in Barbados?

“I think we should use the memory of Trevor Clarke in doing what we can to dismantle that negative and oppressive system that we still have unfortunately in our country,” Comissiong said. (FW)   

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