News Feed

October 26, 2016 - Sick airline A top official of regional airline ... +++ October 26, 2016 - Teachers back away from court threat The Barbados Union of Teachers (BUT ... +++ October 26, 2016 - Beacon supports regulatory move Beacon Insurance Company is giving ... +++ October 26, 2016 - Challenge series returns Sunday Suzuki Challenge Series (SCS) point ... +++ October 26, 2016 - Waste to energy still alive – Lowe The Cahill project might be a thing ... +++ October 26, 2016 - No decision on Hyatt, says Town Planner Following Monday’s unannounced si ... +++

Ancient laws to be reviewed

COURT TODAY BLOCKA review of ancient laws on Barbados’ statute books is on the cards.

Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite made the disclosure in a recent interview with Barbados TODAY.

The issue of antiquated laws was raised earlier this year by Registrar of the Supreme Court, Barbara Cooke-Alleyne, during a conference on Juvenile Justice.

She suggested at that time that reform of the Juvenile Justice System must include more severe sanctions against negligent parents. She referred to laws dating back to 1904 where a parent found guilty of harming, abusing, neglecting, abandoning or assaulting his or her child can be fined only $24 and $120 if the child dies as a result.

“Those laws need to go,” she said. “We need to repeal that and come again.”

Earlier this year in the magistrates’ courts, a 25-year-old mother was convicted, reprimanded and discharged when she appeared before Magistrate Douglas Frederick, after using obscene language to police officers at Bush Hill, St. Michael.

Nakita Thandica Karen Jones, of Oxley Street, St. Michael admitted to the District ‘A’ Magistrates’ Court that she used the words “This is my *****. I got a child home hungry and I got to get two ***** before I go home.”

That was as a result of police officers arresting her after seeing her along Bush Hill clad in only a short top, with her vagina and buttocks exposed. The policemen asked her to dress and move from the area.

When she went appeared in court, she was initially fined the $10 maximum penalty for using insulting language to a police. After she was unable to pay the fine, Magistrate Frederick convicted, reprimanded and discharged her.

Last month, another woman pleaded guilty before the courts to causing a disturbance on Roebuck Street.

In that case, Natasha Felicia Prentice, of Citrus Lane, Lower Burney, St. Michael was charged after causing a disturbance in the vicinity of Harford House, where the Juvenile and Coroners’ Courts are located.

After being spoken to by a constable about being boisterous, Prentice began cursing the officer in question and another whom she told to “Carr’ wunna ***** and don’t ****ing touch me.”

She too was fined the maximum $10 under the law by acting Magistrate Elwood Watts.

Brathwaite told Barbados TODAY: “We need to have – and we have pledged to have – a Law Reform Commission so we can have a continuous revision of our laws as opposed to having to wait until people realize by accident that they are outdated.”

“The drafting is being done so once that is in place, hopefully that law will be in place next year. Then it will be a question of the resources to put that Commission in place,” the Attorney-General explained.

3 Responses to Ancient laws to be reviewed

  1. Alex Alleyne August 19, 2015 at 7:44 am

    What about those under age young ladies who go “missing” with or without their consent , got the Police looking here there and every where , then show back up days or weeks later like nothing happen .
    If it is that some people get charge then this foolishness will stop or at lease cut some what .

  2. bobo August 19, 2015 at 12:22 pm

    Since the existence of Barbados the laws were created for the professionals of the country-par ex the speaker of the House and minister Lashley from St Philip are just a few- the racist laws were not there to benefit the majority, because the majority remained in ignorance of their rights.

    Barbados i ancient laws needs a new foundation, govenment entities needs employee contracts, duration two years, if the employee performance is at ground zero they will have to go, saving the tax payers lots of monies par ex. J Broomes

    We need laws that can change the nasty habits of people — implemented and enforced

  3. Heather Cole
    Heather Cole August 19, 2015 at 2:14 pm

    Actually he needs to start at the top and the present and work his way back. How about putting that promised Ingegrity Legislation on the books. We have been waiting 7 long years without any anwers to this broken manifesto promise. Join us as we lobby to correct the political and other wrongs of society.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *