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Venezuela’s claim on Guyana affects Barbados

Guyana’s President, David Granger, says neighbouring Venezuela’s claim to its territory ropes in a number of Caribbean states, including Barbados, and this underlines the importance of the dispute to CARICOM.

Granger, who arrived here on Wednesday for the 36th annual CARICOM Heads of Government conference, told a group of Guyanese and diplomats resident in Barbados that Venezuela’s most recent claim in a dispute reaching back over 100 years is “outrageous” and “absurd”.

Last month, the Government of Venezuela proclaimed a Presidential Decree claiming maritime waters that encompass Guyana’s exclusive economic zone, in which a US exploration company two months back announced that it had found minerals on the seabed indicating there may be large deposits of oil beneath.

Guyana’s President, David Granger, addressing Guyanese-Barbadians last night.

Guyana’s President, David Granger, addressing Guyanese-Barbadians last night.

“We are on the brink of a major petroleum find. There is petroleum in Guyana, and Venezuela knows that more than anybody else,” Granger said at a reception hosted by Guyana’s Consul General to Barbados, Michael Brotherson.

The President continued: “Among other things, this is what has triggered one of the most absurd and outrageous claims on Guyana’s exclusive economic zone.

“In fact, the lines that the Venezuelan republic has drawn go as far right as to Surinamese waters. It is not just past Trinidad, Barbados and Grenada and Guyana, but it is gone into Surinamese waters as well.

“It is understood that parts of the zone to which President Granger referred, are subjects of maritime territorial agreements that Guyana, Barbados, Grenada and Trinidad and Tobago are soon to sign off on. The pending agreements are being scrutinised by regional officials and fall within CARICOM’s mechanism for cooperation.

Describing Venezuela’s recent decree, which is seen as an extension of a massive claim on Guyana’s land mass that Guyana contends was settled 116 years ago, as an extremely serious development, Granger said: “We are working with our colleagues in the Caribbean Community to ensure that the two things which our leaders stood for in 1965 –– national independence and regional integration –– are upheld at this CARCIOM heads of government conference and through future development of CARICOM.”

Granger said 1965 saw the genesis of what is now CARICOM because in that year the leaders of the yet-to-be-independent states of Guyana, Forbes Burnham, and of Antigua, Vere Bird, met Premier Errol Barrow here and the idea of the regional organization was born.

“I do believe that if the entire Community could come together with that same spirit that we had 50 years ago, we could overcome this problem, obstacle.”

Granger spoke of the restraining effect that the dispute with Venezuela has had on Guyana’s economy.

“We have come here under a cloud. We have laboured with a monkey on our back in all of our post-independence history. And that is the territorial claim by Venezuela.

“It is something that has obstructed our development, it has drained funds away from other forms of development.  It has blocked hydro-power investment, intimidated investors.”

He added: “Right now we are faced with something called a decree, which was promulgated exactly five days after I paid a visit by helicopter to the Exxon Mobile exploration platform in Guyana EEZ [exclusive economic zone].

“It is all tendentious, contrived, intentioned to make everything Guyana does, we must run to Caracas and seek.

“Well, we can’t have that.”

6 Responses to Venezuela’s claim on Guyana affects Barbados

  1. Harry turnover July 3, 2015 at 7:42 am

    No Granger,it ONLY affects Guyana. If as you say it affects Barbados,the most easterly of the Islands,it would therefore mean that the WHOLE Island chain would be affected too as boundaries would have to be adjusted.
    That is your problem mate, Stuart and Bajans not that stupid.

  2. J. Payne July 3, 2015 at 1:02 pm


    Yes it does. Venezuela claims land within Barbados’ seabed. Much like how it claims Bird Rock in the Commonwealth of Dominica… Barbados was silent though.

    NGO reports Barbados is bidding oil blocks in Venezuelan waters

    The government of Barbados has launched an oil and gas bid for 26 offshore blocks, two of which are allegedly located in part in Venezuelan waters, claimed on Monday Aníbal Martínez, head of non-governmental organization Frente Nacional Pro Defensa del Petróleo Venezolano (National Front for the Defense of Venezuelan Oil).

    Martínez said that the government of Barbados put 26 oil and gas blocks for tender stretching more than 70,000 square kilometers. He added that there are two blocks in the bid, called Botton Bay and Crane Bay, 70 percent of whose area would be in Venezuelan waters.

    “This amounts to an area of 5,200 square kilometers. It is a hostile act on the part of Barbados, and we have to be on alert. Even if it was one square centimeter, we cannot let this to happen,” said the Venezuelan oil expert.

  3. brerlou July 3, 2015 at 10:38 pm

    We all know the true nature of the Venezuelan government, which seeks to control even their local media. Every time the Venezuelan government believes the super-powers either have their hands full, (Ukraine and ISIL,) they bring up that absurd century old claim again.

    • brerlou July 3, 2015 at 10:55 pm

      United, we stand. Divided, we fall. Notice that Cuba is moving back into the USA sphere of influence. How does that affect Venezuela? Is Chavez beginning to feel isolated?
      Guyana is to the East but what is Venezuela’s relationship with her neighbor to the West? Colombia itself has allowed the USA to increase her military presence in Colombia, for obvious reasons, since Venezuela does not approve of the increase.

  4. Jus me July 4, 2015 at 12:06 pm

    VENEZUELA can walk ALL ov er

    idiots .
    Jus big up Nigga talk.

  5. Jus me July 4, 2015 at 12:19 pm

    En we all does know Guyanese does not Eva Lie
    BET DEM SORRY DEM SOLD Off allall DEM Army

    Guns to de


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