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No justice for ‘Lucky Thomas’ after 26 years

Complaints about sloth in Barbados’ judicial processes have reached a new low.

Twenty-six years after sustaining a career-ending injury, retired police constable Hadley Thomas is still waiting on compensation from the Government.

In an interview with Barbados TODAY the frustrated 63-year-old said despite a settlement having reportedly being reached in the case, he was yet to receive any monetary redress from Government.

Retired police constable Hadley Thomas

Retired police constable Hadley Thomas

Thomas, who now walks with the aid of crutches, related that on October 10, 1989, he went to work at Central Police Station where he was stationed at the Criminal Records Office.

The former scenes of crime officer stated he subsequently pushed a heavy entrance door to the department and it came completely off, dropped and punctured his left foot.

“Apparently work was being done on the door during the day by a carpenter or someone and had not been completed and it was just propped in place without hinges. There was no sign or anything to indicate what the situation was and I attempted to use the door as I was accustomed doing whenever I go to work,” Thomas said.

What followed has been a horror story for the former detective, ironically nicknamed “Lucky Thomas”.

The incident resulted in a hairline fracture, trombosis of the leg and damaged circulation. His foot was placed in a cast over a two-year period.

The The incident resulted in a hairline fracture, trombosis of the leg and damaged circulation.

The incident resulted in a hairline fracture, trombosis of the leg and damaged circulation.

Thomas said his attorney-at-law David Simmons, later Chief Justice Sir David, filed a lawsuit on his behalf against the office of the Commissioner of Police and the Government in 1990.

During this period he continued to receive medical attention for the injury at his expense.

Thomas was subsequently forced to retire from the Royal Barbados Police Force on medical grounds as his injury did not improve.

He later travelled to the United States where he sought further medical assistance for his deteriorating condition.

He came under the care of specialist Dr Joseph Sciortino in Brooklyn, New York, who in a 2004 report, wrote: “The patient continues to have intermittent claudication and pain. The patient has developed a causalgia which is permanent in nature. The patient has been controlled with intermittent visits to myself for pain medication and therapy. He understands that this is a permanent condition which will deteriorate overtime as he ages. The patient continues to wear a vascular stocking and take different pain medications. The patient continues to be under my medical care and has a permanent disability and injury.”

Thomas, who now resides in the United States, told Barbados TODAY that in the intervening years he was informed that Government had come to a settlement in the matter.

Following Sir David’s assumption of higher office, the case was passed on to another attorney; now a High Court judge. Attempts to reach that judge over the past two days have not been successful.

However, to date, Thomas has received no compensation and continues to receive treatment for his condition.

Efforts to reach Attorney-General Adriel Brathwaite on the matter today were unsuccessful. However, an official of his office indicated that if liability had been accepted and the matter settled, all answers related to monetary compensation, if awarded, would have to be provided by Thomas’ attorney. 

3 Responses to No justice for ‘Lucky Thomas’ after 26 years

  1. Divine Duchess
    Divine Duchess May 8, 2015 at 1:14 am

    Omg how does he even still have that leg? Believe it or not they are hoping u perish before they give u a red cent smh. Because even if they settle for whatever amount that doesn’t matter…when u will get the money does!!! Sir sorry to say but….you now gaw wait!!!!

  2. Tony Webster May 8, 2015 at 6:20 am

    Tick whichever box you feel appropriate:-
    1. Someone made this up.
    2. I feel ashamed to be a Bajan, as I read.
    3. God will speak to a person this morning in High Political Authority, who will personally go over to the SUPREME COURT, and speak to another Exalted person sitting somewhere very high, and TELL him to fix this (or else) by conversing with the other exalted guy holding the PURSE-STRINGS, so that a back-payment will be made to Mr. Thomas within the next week, and he will receive monthly stipends as of the end of may, 2015
    4. A public AND a wrotten apology direct to Mr. Thomas will be made in the same two week’s time.
    5. If God is still a BAJAN… then nothing will happen.
    6. Instead of FIXING this scab on Barbados fair face, a Senator-Lady Lady will pass another Labour-Law, so that this did not actually happen, and therefore, does not need fixing, but will consider sending a note for consideration, come next Thursday.

    Go ahead, start ticking.

  3. Donna Harewood May 11, 2015 at 10:38 am

    Just another Bajan horror story. The Injustice System at its very best! This is no more than a jungle where survival of the fittest (richest, most powerful, holders of the political reins etc.) is a daily fact of life. Who cares about you, Mr. Lucky? Nobody who counts in this country, for sure! God bless you and keep you until somebody pays!


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