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To be well or not to be is the call

We live in the age of wild –– and for some of us, whacky –– health claims. Joining the miracle diets of late have been the miracle home workouts, miracle herbs, miracle sex stimulants, and now miracle foods that a gullible people have been assured will only bring miraculous results, failing which you may take comfort in the “risk-free” and seven- up to 30-day guarantee return of your money by some of the Internet promotors.

There is such bombardment in the media, by way of advertising, locally and internationally, every day, the average person knows not what is a valid claim from what is not. And it does not help when “qualified” health experts differ exponentially on the miraculous treatment.

It is no secret there are many challenges within the health industry. Especially discomfiting and dangerous is that some of these miracle drugs and foods may be quite harmful, though they be espoused as “natural”. A contingent risk is that the consumption of miracle drugs and foods, as substitutes for a known cures and tested edibles, might derail more appropriate medical treatment to the point of no return and actually and contribute to a body of alarming unhealthiness, respectively..

In our print and electronic media, we continually come face to face with volleys of promises of amazing and miraculous results from “natural” and other complementary medicines. And testimonials to their efficacy are never sparse.

For many a reader, listener or television viewer, the presentations have been nothing short of impressive, convincing and enticing –– if not, at the very least, shocking. And this, understandably, is of concern to your regular medical practitioner.

It makes you wonder how effective the ironic disclaimer is – after these dazzling radio and TV announcements – that the foregoing were not intended to offer medical advice; and that you should seek that from your own medical doctor.

The latest annoyance for our physicians will have been the proclamations of the world-renowned Dr Sebi, the self-declared curer of AIDS, diabetes, sickle cell anaemia, leukemia and a host of other ailments. Dr Sebi’s miracle foods are electric in nature, and range from fruits like bananas, berries, oranges, mangoes (all with seeds), to nuts and grains like black wild rice, to greens freshly picked, to a wide variety of herb teas covering from lemon grass to fennel to sea moss to sage and more. An electric food list for an electrical body that each one of us possesses, he argues.

The doctor’s list, to be truthful, is not so out of step with other complementary propositions. It is his pronouncement on meats that is staggering.

“You have to stop eating lamb which is artifical; chicken which is artificial. Cows are artificial; hogs are artificial. You have to stop eating these animals. All these things we eat, I used to do it and I loved it –– my bacon and my eggs in the morning, with my toast and my butter, and my Ovaltine. I loved it!” he declared.

Who said confession wasn’t good for the soul?

The herbalist also cautioned against the use of starches like breadfruit, sweet potato and cassava.

“Cassava . . . has cyanide; it is going to affect your brain. Cyanide is an enemy of yourself; sweet potato likewise . . . . I said starches aren’t food; but that’s what my mamma used to give me: sweet potatoes, eddoes, yam, cassava; and I liked it –– because you become accustomed to it like a drug addict. It’s worse than cocaine.”

It’s ironical that the vast majority of our centenarians over the years have boasted of sweet potatoes and yams as their staple –– and chicken, beef and pork to boot.

We make no claim to the expertise knowledge the wellness guru Dr Sebi is said to possess; but we are aware many of our nutritionists and doctors do not share his views –– though some conventional doctors have been blending traditional medicine with the complementary. It would seem investigation is needed here.

For all the conflicting information, the protocols for such combinations of treatments need to be established sooner than later –– more now than ever. Our healthy lives literally hang on it!

To whom then shall we look for the truth?


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