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Dying out

Worrell wants more youth in bodybuilding

One of Barbados’ most successful bodybuilders ever, Hoskyn Worrell, is not pleased with the level of bodybuilding he sees on the island.

Worrell, who became the first man at age 49 to win a Mr Barbados title, which is his second overall at the ALLMAX Nutrition National Championships held last weekend at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre, told Barbados TODAY the sport seemed to be going backwards rather than forward.

Hoskyn Worrell - Mr. Barbados 2014

Hoskyn Worrell – Mr. Barbados 2014

“No [the sport is not going forward]. It is going back because in yesteryear we had like seven to eight or even fifteen men in a division but now we have three and four persons in a division and it tells me that our bodybuilding is suffering.

“Our men’s physique and women’s bikini are on the rise but the men’s bodybuilding is dropping and we need to get the youngsters that are coming into juniors to keep up and get the sport to where it was because it is the older guys like myself that keep coming every year and keeping the sport alive,” he said.

The veteran bodybuilder who currently holds at least fourteen titles noted that bodybuilding was a tough sport and explained that it needed some serious investment in order for it to get back to where it once was.

“We need sponsorship because bodybuilding is a tough sport and we need rest, vitamins, protein and fruits and some of the jobs that we have. We still have our families to take care of and to buy a bottle of supplement is expensive. Sometimes you go out there to get sponsorship and some of the people would tell you they do not have money and that is the problem. If we can get people to come in and help with sponsorship we would get back to where we are supposed to be,” Worrell explained.

He added that there was only so much the Barbados Bodybuilding Federation Association (BBFA) could do.

The diminutive athlete highlighted that almost every year Barbados won the Caribbean And Central American Games (CAC) despite the lack of support.

Looking ahead Worrell said he was not sure whether he would defend his Mr Barbados title but had his eyes set on competing outside of the island and among those competitions would be the CAC games being held in Mexico in November and the Darcy Beckles classic coming up on October 25 which he has won six times so far.

“I am focusing on getting involved with some outside competitions to generate some funds and then I will see what happens next year. There is the Darcy Beckles classic and I will be looking for my seventh title. I also want to capture the overall title and get a professional card at CAC in November,” he said.

He added: “Preparation for any competition is very hard because I have to step up my training and try to get back into shape and be better than what I was at nationals. I train hard year round, doing a lot of cardio which is very important in preparation and dieting. I train twice, six days a week for competition and that helps me a lot.”

Worrell, packing a solid 177 and a half pounds, said he was very happy with what he had accomplished so far because when he looked back there were many guys who dropped out of the sport and he was still around.

The former Ellerslie student who started his career at age 27 said he never wanted to be a part of the bodybuilding circuit but after looking at his father and uncles train as well as a cousin who was a former bodybuilder, he was encouraged to get involved with the sport.

“I came up seeing my father and uncles working out in the backyard so I started to train at a gym in Goodland and a cousin of mine used to compete. So he told me why I don’t start to train for a show, that I would do well and I said yeah and he said yeah. I did not know anything about dieting at the time and I told myself I will train and see what happens. When I competed at nationals for the first time I came second and that is when my career took off and I have never looked back since,” Worrell recalled, speaking like a true champion.


One Response to Dying out

  1. Rawle Spooner
    Rawle Spooner September 5, 2014 at 8:24 pm

    So true champ and its friggin sad to see the decline hope it is not allowed to die,come on powers to be.


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