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Cancer show –– cum soca

House of Soca and cancer society help spread the seriousness of the disease

The sound of sweet Crop Over music filled the air in Lears, St Michael, in the wee hours last Sunday, when the House Of Soca calypso tent and the Barbados Cancer Society teamed up for the all-inclusive fund-raising breakfast show CYANA –– Cancer, You Are Not Alone.

It was not only about partying or enjoying the music of the season. And the reason for the show was clearly stated when members of the tent joined their colleague Gallon onstage for the first performance of the night –– his 2013 Crop Over song The Big C, that encourages listeners to treat cancer with the seriousness they should, and get themselves checked. The Cancer Society sponsored the calypsonian and used the song as its anthem to increase awareness for all cancers.

Gallon’s performance set the tone for the rest of the show that ended as the day was dawning.



Patrons thoroughly enjoyed themselves, dining on fish cakes, samosas, split pea soup, and porridge, and choosing from the array of drinks, particularly the cappuccino mixes.

Patrons really liked the performances of first-time Pic-O-De-Crop semifinalist and Junior Monarch finalist Sammy G’s My Tribute and 2011 Pic-O-De-Crop Monarch Popsicle’s Dah Don’ Bodder Me and Stinking Me so much, they called for more.

Sammy G

Sammy G

They also took to Sharky with Crop Over, Sir Ruel who sang What We Need, Jimmy Dan’s tribute to the festival Leff  Me Alone, Shaki-K’s Isn’t It Funny?, Gallon’s Indian Party, Fraswaa’s Frighten, Dre’s O-B-City, Honesty’s Cancer Song, which the artiste sang without forgetting a line, unlike on opening night and when she faced the judges, and Mr Villain.

The second part of the show was equally entertaining, filled with sweet soca from Adrenalin (Road Rage), Frost (Judging Point), Priceless (Fiesta! Fiesta!), GQ (Neighbour), Callie Girl (Wuk Up De Bumpa), Popsicle, Speedy and Eric Lewis.

All the songs were well delivered, and voices were so crisp, ringing out across the still morning air, that they stirred some patrons to the point where they could not contain themselves. They sang along, danced and waved their hands and more importantly they did not fall asleep or leave.

MC Yolanda Holder was also good, as she kept the show flowing and the hilarious jokes coming, as she entertained the patrons who watched on as others went to claim sponsors’ prizes, inclusive of breakfast at Divi Southwinds’ Pureocean Restaurant, and jewellery made by Callie Girl.

As the show drew to a close, musical director Ian Sealy noted that this was a hard year for tent, in particular manager Sharon Carew-White, whose brother Dr Sean Carew died late last month from lung cancer, despite being a non-smoker.

To show her how much she was appreciated, a wooden plaque carved by Dre, containing a photo of all the members of the House Of Soca family, which she has been in charge of for 11 years, was presented to her.

The tent’s involvement with the Barbados Cancer Society arose out of a final wish from Carew-White’s brother, who wanted others to be educated and helped by his passing. The Cancer Society was identified as among the causes which should be given attention.

Proceeds from the show will go towards the purchase of a bronchoscope, costing about $30,000, for the Queen Elizabeth Hospital’s Respiratory Unit.

CYANA is the first fund-raiser House Of Soca has undertaken, as it works towards purchase of the equipment, as well as creating a greater awareness of cancer. Donations may still be made, said Carew-White, who said she may be contacted.

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