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Gorg’s got his rum – and more

The popular Crop Over refrain for most men this year, even women, is: Me woman lef me, me woman lef me, she really horn me, she really lef me. Ohhhhh, ohhhhhh, but I got my rum. 

It is penned and sung by a young man, who for the past 11 years has been an up-and-coming star in the groovy and bashment soca genres in Barbados. His real name is Omar Sobers, but we all know him as Gorg.

At first glance, his uncombed hair and tall rotund frame would give the impression of a “ruff and tuff” man, not so well tuned into social graces. However, there is nothing farther from the truth. Believe it or not, Gorg is a gentle giant, as one lady called him earlier this week when he visited Barbados TODAY offices in Warrens to have a sit-down with Bajan Vibes.

We asked him to tell us the real story about his popular song My Rum.

“I doan call it [the biggest track]; I let the people call it. I just thankful that nothing hasn’t changed. I’m still the old Gorg. Going in my merry way. I am just thankful that the public is embracing all of the music now; not only mine. As for the song, parts of it is a true story. De woman went ’long and left me fuh real,” he said with a smile.

“But is just reality that I was dealing with in this song. I honestly was not looking for this sort of response from the public and from everybody, but at the end of the day someone told me, ‘Gorg, once you deal with reality, people goin’ latch onto it’; and that is exactly what happened.

“Everybody hold a horn at some point,” says Gorg, but he clarified that despite what the song says, “she [the woman who broke Gorg’s heart, didn’t take his Jordans.

“Well, no, she ain’t take my shoes though,” he said with a chuckle.

But how exactly did he get involved in the whole music business?

It all started as “a joke thing” when Gorg was singing for fun with De Outpatients, a fun group who had their origins at his alma mater The Lodge School.

“I started officially in 2003; this is my 11th year in this. It started with Boom Tik Tik, and so on. Back then, I was doing a lot of 160 [bpms]-styled music. There were songs like Pooch Back And Get Wuk, Lef  Behind The People Truck, and then probably like around 2008, I slowed it down a bit with some ragga socas songs like Tipsy, Keep Drinks Coming, and then mixing it up again, still doing it fast, doing some ragga, some bashment soca, still at 120 bpms.

“It is a mixture of everything, and to this day I still do a bit of all.”

As for how the season has been going for him, he says well. He just released another song and had been working on a new project – SuperLynks – a group which he formed with Samuel Hardware Bridgeman and Cheriza Reezy Kothdiwala.

“We have a riddim; we call it the SuperLynks riddim. We did a song for Peter Ram called Quicksand UpgradeCrimeson is also on that and I also have a song on that called Drop It. That is bashment soca!” said Gorg, who dropped another song on Monday called Happy Hour, and he is pleased with the response so far.

“Everybody loves a Happy Hour,” he told Bajan Vibes.

With that last statement in mind, we asked him why he sings primarily about alcohol.

“At the end of the day, I always tell everybody to drink responsibly. Know your limit and, if you know that you are going out with a whole set of friends, have a designated driver. That is usually the first thing because at the end of the day I can’t stop people from drinking. Drinking will happen with or without me.

“You go out, yuh party. Yuh see girls, tek a drink wid them; but just be responsible all the time is wha I does tell people.

“I doan promote overdrinking. I don’t agree with that at all. Crop Over is rum. All those canes, turn into rum at some point,” he said before tackling our next important question: how did the name Gorg come about?

“I got that on the second field playing football at Lodge. I was playing defence. I was now in first form, but I was tall and a bit slimmer back then. I ran in playing defence and the men just moved away. One of them said, ‘He running in like a real Gorg yuh’, and it stuck.

“At the time, it was Junior Gorg but as I got older and get a li’l beard, get more girls, the Junior get drop and, call me Gorg!”



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