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Sugar concern

Plea to correct sweetener levels in drinks

Pamela Coke-Hamilton

Pamela Coke-Hamilton

Executive director of Caribbean Export, Pamela Coke Hamilton, has raised an alarm over the amount of sugar content in beverages being served up locally.

And she has issued a call for “a change in policy systems” to correct the issue, saying it could continue to cost the country millions. Saying that sugar consumption could be directly linked to diabetes and by extension amputation, Coke Hamilton said the issue of food safety should take into account food consumption.

“Unfortunately for our local people, the requirements for sugar consumption is [high]. I have a deep issue with the amount of sugar used in Barbados,” said Coke Hamilton.

She was responding to questions from the media following the signing of a memorandum of understanding on food safety between the Inter-American Institute For Cooperation On Agriculture and the CARICOM Regional Organization For Standards And Quality at the Hilton Resort on Wednesday.

Coke Hamilton said she often informed Government representatives not to “delink food consumption from the fact that Barbados has one of the highest per capita amputation rates in the world outside of a war zone for diabetes”.

“It is directly linked. So unless you change your food policy systems, this is going to continue, and it is going to continue to cost on the health care side. The same is true for hypertension, obesity and cancer related to obesity.

“This whole food safety thing is more than just safety. It is also long-term sustainability as a healthy country or as a healthy region,” she said, adding that the issue was
not unique to Barbados.

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