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The Worrell Dream to make true

It isn’t the usual thing for guru-like economists and statisticians to go “manifesting” (the exercise of positive thought projection of a thing or outcome wished for, as practised and taught by life success coaches these days the world over), which makes for interesting study the Barbados Central Bank Governor’s novel outreach to the people of Barbados. Dr DeLisle Worrell couldn’t step any farther from the box.

Not to be misunderstood as having no confidence in the Government of Barbados, the Governor portrayed his assurance in the restored growth of the economy, but on a belief in the maturity, application, frugality and determination of ordinary Barbadians, and to the creativity, goodwill and common sense of business leaders. He was not basing his confidence in a regenerated economy on Government action per se.

Manifesting, the life coaches say, is not magic nor obeah. It is the natural attraction of goodness and well-being. It is a systematic method of daily or weekly ritualizing and envisioning, drawing upon the infinite power of God Almighty, or on the law of attraction of the Universe, for a desired and appropriate result; for abundance; and you have to stick with it.

Patience is a virtue, and a necessity.

Not to brush aside Government efforts though, Dr Worrell said at his third-quarter post-economic review news conference yesterday that he was confident as well that the current Medium-Term Fiscal Strategy, focused on sustainable growth, would work for the betterment of the island. Whatever else he was asking us to do, we needed to be patient, because that approach of our leaders was not a flash in the pan. Whatever we do, we must not undermine, jeopardize or endanger the integrity of our foreign reserves.

The human element of Dr Worrell’s dissertation is worthy of note.

”My confidence is based, not on the Government, but on Barbadians and Barbadian enterprise, and the fact that Barbadians know how to dig into their own reserves and their own capabilities and address the issues that have to be addressed in order to move this country forward. We have done it before and we will do it again. It is not about Government. Government does not earn foreign exchange, Government cannot grow the economy; it is the private sector.

“Barbadians have every reason to be confident of our future. We are the best in the Caribbean through our strength of character and through investing in ourselves. We have beaten the odds before, and we know it is not as difficult as it seems, once you buckle down to the task.”

The question is: will Barbadians take the vow individually of personal responsibility and resolution, and make the commitment to labour towards the fulfilment of national economic progress? Or will we continue to be consumed by political rivalry over governance and implementation of policy?

Will we have the resolve that Dr Worrell envisions to help make ourselves a national life that is less stressful, less conflictual, more productive, and ultimately back on a path of sustainable growth? Can each of us personally elect to take control of what we can, acknowledging what we can’t change and finding a way to make the best of what we could, no matter our situation in life?

The truth is that no matter at what stage of life we may be, successful or struggling, there are others elsewhere, who have been under much worse circumstances –– some of whom have risen up, taking responsibility for their lot in life. Regrettably, yet others remain far worse off than we are.

It might pay us well to share in Dr Worrell’s massive dream, taking prudent action every day in what we do and say as Barbadians to achieve our well deserved national success. We could take some consolation –– not in a false sense of security –– in knowing that no matter how challenged the economy may be, how unusually high unemployment is, how debilitating the taxes, that we still have opportunities, and have it better than many other countries for whom bloodshed is higher on the agenda of resolution than the economy.

Is it for us a glass half-empty or half-full? Or will we envision and manifest a glass overflowing?

We are agreed that where we are now is not where we have to stay. And we must concur too that the idea amongst us all must be to pull ourselves up together by our bootstraps to what we all desire. This is possible when you have the edge, as Dr Worrell indicates we do.

As the Governor says, it will be patience, persistence, determination and excellence that win the day.

One Response to The Worrell Dream to make true

  1. edward marston October 27, 2013 at 8:34 am

    Manifesting is no substitute for clear economic planning and prioritization. The challenge for Barbados is to attract foreign investment and create employment – particularly for the young. For nations and individuals alike good housekeeping is the only path to security and prosperity.


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