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Sure health as a duty

We must admit that in our print and electronic media, in more recent

times, there have been volleys of promises of amazing and miraculous results

from “natural” and other complementary medicines. And testimonials to

their efficacy have not been sparse.

For many a reader, listener or television viewer, the presentations

have been nothing short of impressive, convincing and enticing. And this,

understandably, is of concern to the conventional medical practitioner.

It makes you wonder how effective the ironic disclaimer is – after these

scintillating promotions – that the foregoing were not intended to offer

medical advice: you should seek that from your own medical doctor.

The latest annoyance for our physicians is the HCG weight loss treatment,

administered through injections by the Caribbean Weight Loss Clinic.

For all the proclaimed testimony of Caribbean Weight Loss Clinic head

Dr Donna Matthews herself, Barbados Association of Medical Practitioners

(BAMP) president Dr Carlos Chase and a majority of his members are not

remotely impressed. They say the treatment’s side effects for men are larger

than usual breasts and an enlarged prostate, and for women an increased

chance of “multiple and ectopic pregnancies”.

And for both genders there are hair loss and mood swings, among other

undesirable and discomfiting things.

If we will indeed seek the counsel of our medical doctors, as the

disclaimer to these non-traditional medicine advertisements advises, then we

must share in the worry of BAMP. That the United States Food and Drug

Administration (FDA) has questioned the safety of the over-the-counter

HCG poundage loss products may give much weight itself to BAMP, but

in America some doctors and many naturopaths have of late been hurling

stones at the FDA for “approving” pharmaceuticals they claim are so laced

with estrogen – and other endocrine disrupter chemicals (EDCs) – that they

were feminizing men.

The endocrine is the system of glands that control the release of

hormones into the blood or lymph.

These health professionals argue that this type of hormonal disruption has

been causing loss of sex drive and sexual ability in men, with their breasts

growing at the rate of their waistline’s as their testosterone levels decline

dramatically. Feminization is the anti-FDA cry.

And, claim the wellness gurus, the EDCs are to be found in well known

FDA-approved drugs, pesticides, household cleaning products and plastics.

Whom shall we look to for the truth?

Back home, BAMP’s public relations officer Dr Lynda Williams has

admitted that some conventional doctors have been blending traditional

medicine with the complementary, which she says needs to be investigated. It

surely is required.

For all the conflicting information, the protocols for such combinations

of treatments must be established here sooner than later – more than ever.

Our truly healthy lives literally depend upon it!

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