News Feed

October 27, 2016 - TVET council looking to improve its offerings – McClean The Barbados Technical Vocational E ... +++ October 27, 2016 - Skills lacking A recent survey has found that Barb ... +++ October 27, 2016 - Selectors axe King ST JOHN’S, Antigua – Ba ... +++ October 27, 2016 - Much ado about nothing, says Arthur Former Prime Minister Owen Arthur i ... +++ October 27, 2016 - Wrong way Don’t rule out privatization! Thi ... +++ October 26, 2016 - Fire at Haggatt Hall Fire tonight engulfed a wooden home ... +++

Scouting is unique

cubsposeThe Crop-Over activities are over, and it would appear that some of the Boy Scouts who were in the Junior Kadooment thoroughly enjoyed themselves, showing off their costumes and dancing to the infectious music as they paraded in front of the judges at the National Stadium.

Some of the scenes of these youngsters dancing and jogging, as portrayed on the television, presented such innocence that it boggles the mind how and why adults would want to tarnish such innocence by encouraging and fostering acts which can easily cause the child to think that what they are doing is correct because adults approve it.

One can remember the incident some time ago when a very young male child was seen and certainly encouraged by adults to win’ or wuk up a female adult who seemed to be encouraging the same action. One can also remember the outcry of the Barbadians who frowned on such. And how right they were.

Children must be encouraged to act their age and enjoy the activities that are designed for children, recognising their ages and vulnerabilities. Children must be able to enjoy childhood without having at such an early age to pick and rack their brains to decide whether this is an adult show or activity or whether they can enjoy this as children.

That brings us to why Scouting is so unique. From its inception, Scouting has supported popular culture, as can be seen by elements in movies, television and even in books. It is certain that as one reviews culture through the eyes of the scouts, one can see scouting portrayed in numerous films and artwork.

I am sure that many reading this article would come to realise that scouting is more than making knots and camping. Do you remember the film Follow Me Boys in the 1966 era when the story spoke of a young man, Lem Siddons, who was part of a travelling band and had a dream of becoming a lawyer.

He decided to settle down and finds a job as a stockboy in the general store of a small town. Trying to fit in, he volunteered to become scoutmaster of the newly formed Troop 1. The story said that becoming more and more involved with the scout troop, he found his plans to become a lawyer being put on the back burner, until he realided that his life has been fulfilled helping the youth of the small town.

Scouts To The Rescue

How about the old classic movie of 1939, Scouts To The Rescue, in which a teenaged Jackie Cooper led the way as an Eagle Scout in a troop of young men who happened upon a buried stash of fake money. At the same time the young scouts were discovered by a tribe of Indians and forced to live in an underground temple where they found expensive radium. These smart boys found a way out of this mess, but not without clever instinct and Boy Scout survival skills.

Now it is clear that these scouting flicks are often dealt with in a humorous manner and many a boy or youngster can sit, watch the movie and enjoy himself without the many “beeps” or cuss words, which are found in so many ordinary films.

The popular culture, which by the way covers a very broad territory, but which is narrowed down in this article to reflect movies and the just completed Junior Kadooment, shows the enjoyment side of how persons view scouting.

It is recorded that a group of stranded scouts has been rescued from a blizzard by emergency crews near Falls Creek. It is believed the group was hiking from Rovers Chalet to Falls Creek when low temperatures, high winds and low visibility forced them to seek shelter in a hut.

Blizzard conditions trapped the group inside the hut. They contacted emergency services and asked for assistance, with two members of the group showing early signs of hypothermia. Police and ambulance crews travelled nine kilometres through the snow to rescue the group a few hours later.

Sergeant Charlie Duncan praised the scouts and emergency services crews for their cool handling of the situation. It is believed that the Scouts and their training were instrumental in their survival. Who knows, maybe sometime in the future there might be a film on this episode.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *