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EU envoy allowed to see Mursi

Mursi supporter holds a poster and sits at a street during an anti-army rally in CairoCAIRO — Egypt’s rulers allowed an EU envoy to meet deposed President Mohamed Mursi, the first time an outsider was given access to him since the army overthrew him and jailed him a month ago, and she said she found him in good health.

European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton revealed little about what she called a “friendly, open and very frank” two-hour conversation with Mursi, after she was flown to an undisclosed location to visit him.

“I’ve tried to make sure that his family know he is well,” said Ashton, who has emerged as one of the only figures accepted by both sides as a potential mediator in a conflict that has plunged the most populous Arab state into violent confrontation.

Ashton said Mursi had access to television and was informed about the situation in the country. Nearly 300 people have been killed in violence since Mursi was removed on July 3, including 80 of his supporters gunned down at dawn on Saturday.

Media have speculated about why the military-backed rulers would have allowed her to meet the ousted leader who had been kept incommunicado for a month.

She denied that she carried an offer to Mursi, who faces charges including murder, of “safe exit” if he were to renounce his claim to the presidency.

Many people have suggested such an arrangement could be part of a deal that would allow Mursi’s Muslim Brotherhood to leave the streets and join an army-backed “road map” to civilian rule, but would require Mursi to abandon his historic mandate as Egypt’s first freely-elected leader.

Ashton said she would not attempt to characterise Mursi’s positions, which no one has heard since he was overthrown.

“I also told him in my two hour conversation that I was not going to represent his views because in the circumstances he cannot correct me if I do it wrongly,” she said. (Reuters)

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