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Brushing success at 19

cropover2013coppersNineteen-year-old Cherisse Beckles knows what she wants and she is going after it.

She owns Ormya, a make-up business that is offering several packages for Foreday Mornin’ and Grand Kadooment.

“I only started getting really interested in makeup probably about two years ago when I bought brushes for my birthday as a treat. I started watching a lot of YouTube tutorials and I really became interested.

“When I left Combermere School, I was doing CAPE exams and I was working at Exotica Make-up for about six weeks and then I went to MAC. I’m on my own now …,” she said.

The entrepreneur noted that she always liked makeup but not to the extent she does now but the more she watched the tutorials and started buying her make-up “piece by piece” she liked it more and more.

“Every year I used to go away. That year when I started to buy makeup, I used the money I would save to go away and that was the year I also got the job.

“I do lashes also and I do clusters as well, which are the ones you put on hair by hair. Right now I’m looking to get into as many markets as possible but makeup is really the main focus of the business. I also sell makeup,” she said.

Beckles, who will operating from her home in Culloden Road from around 4 a.m. on Grand Kadooment, stated that her festival packages which can be seen on her Facebook page Ormya Makeup, were done with the recession in mind.

“Crop-Over is a day you will get volume. You could take down the prices somewhat. I came up with variety so that the people with different budgets will be able to pick better. My lowest package is $15 which is just basically eye-shadows and mascara.

‘You will find there are people who want stuff for Crop-Over but don’t want the whole shebang, especially people who are not into makeup. If you just want gems or glitter pearls I can do that also. All of the prime time for Crop-Over is booked from 4 to 8:30 a.m. That’s when I start. It will only be me.

“To come up with the packages I used my experience with customers to determine what people like and what they don’t like. There are some customers who will like everything and there are some who will like the minimum and they are those who like natural. You just need to create packages around this time that will suit different customers,” Beckles said.

For her Foreday Mornin’ customers she will start applying their makeup from 8 p.m.

She also said that lashes were lucrative at this time, as “everybody wants their lashes done”.

After the festival she intends to start make-up classes on week day evenings as she has had some enquiries.

The student of the UWI, said more people were wearing makeup and one thing she had noticed was that they had gone from applying it themselves to seeking out the professionals.

“When you look at the pictures [on Facebook] you can see who it themselves and who went to somebody. You can look at their eyebrows and I think that Bajans are now grasping the concept of eyebrows and blending of the eye shadows,” she added.

For revellers jumping, she said it is okay to match the colours with the costumes and skin tones but she would not suggest that “you match your eye shadows”.

“As it is Crop-Over and people like to keep within the colour scheme that’s okay or if you’re not a matching person, who can get complementing colours, with orange and red you can wear a gold eye, a red lip. I despise when people try to match the whole face together,” Beckles said with a chuckle.

As for the name of the business, Ormya, she noted it took her a while to come up with one and when she did she tattooed it at the back of her arm.

“The name stems from the fact that I want to be free financially, in terms of working hours, free to be creative so the name is actually African derived from the name Orma which means free men. I added the ‘y’ to make it feminine,” explained Beckles who is on her way to success, one brush stroke at a time. (DS)

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