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Hero’s welcome for Bolivian president

LA PAZ — Bolivian President Evo Morales arrived home to a hero’s welcome late yesterday, saying some European countries’ refusal to let his plane enter their airspace because of suspicion it carried fugitive US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden was a provocation aimed at all of South America.

Morales was greeted by his cabinet and cheering, fist-pumping crowds at La Paz’s airport after a dramatic journey from Moscow that ignited a diplomatic furore when his plane had to make an unscheduled stop in Vienna on Tuesday evening.

“This was an open provocation toward a continent, not just a president,” said Morales, his hair strewn with flower petals thrown by people in traditional Andean garb. “North American imperialism uses its people to terrify and intimidate us. I just want to say they will never frighten us because we are a people of dignity and sovereignty.”

Other Latin American leaders were also fuming over the plane incident, with heads of state in the 12-nation South American bloc Unasur denouncing the “unfriendly and unjustifiable acts.

The bloc said a group of leaders from member countries would hold an emergency summit in Bolivia today to discuss the matter. Unasur includes close leftist allies of Bolivia like Venezuela, Ecuador and Argentina as well as more centrist governments like those in Chile and Brazil.

Earlier yesterday, Bolivia accused the United States of trying to “kidnap” Morales, after his plane was denied permission to fly over France and Portugal.

The Bolivian government said it had filed a formal complaint with the United Nations and was studying other legal avenues to prove its rights had been violated under international law. (Reuters)

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