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Strive to improve

On leaving the protected school environment students immediately enter into a world where survival of the fittest is the law and the weak tend fade away.

Former head boy of the Lester Vaughan School and featured speaker at the school’s awards ceremony, Chad Burrowes, issued this warning today to the student body of his alma mater at Cane Garden, St. Thomas.

Burrowes, who is also the president of the Lester Vaughan School Old Scholars Association, noted that in life individuals meet a variety of circumstances in which the way they have prepared for and handled each, as well as how they have learnt from them, determined if they are considered successes or failure.

He said: “From the time we are born, our lives are measured by a series of accomplishments which are used to gauge our level of maturity, intelligence, integrity and pretty much, how we are viewed by our peers. How we deal with every challenge we face in our lives determines the level of success we will reap.”

Burrowes encouraged students to make realistic plans and follow through, but at the same time not to be caught in a fools’ landing.

He explained that plans were only commitments made in the minds of thinkers, but reality was where the actions of seven billion people and their ancestors in collusion with nature have the ability to derail an individual’s best efforts.

Burrowes encouraged the student body to work hard for what they wanted, but stressed that this advice was relevant in an island that was filled with love, compassion and equality in access to resources.

Burrowes, who is a bio-chemist said: “Today, we live in a global community where competition is stiff. We no longer live in an island that is isolated from global practices and demands, as evidenced by the global financial crisis.

“Whatever happens in one part of the world that was once seemingly remote from our locale, has the potential to shut down money markets, push up the cost of energy and other consumer products while further crushing those who are at the proverbial bottom of the barrel. Unfortunately, in this crab bucket world, very few persons are willing to give you a break to prove yourself or to ease any hardships being experienced.”

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