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Kerry: Other governments also safeguard their security

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN — Nearly all national governments, not just the United States, use “lots of activities” to safeguard their interests and security, US Secretary of State John Kerry said today, responding for the first time to allegations that Washington spied on the European Union and other allies.

The EU has strongly demanded that the United States explain a report in a German magazine that Washington is spying on the group, saying that, if true, the alleged surveillance was “shocking”.

The Guardian newspaper said in an article late on Sunday that the United States had also targeted non-European allies including Japan, South Korea and India for spying — an awkward development for Kerry as he arrived for an Asian security conference in Brunei today.

Kerry confirmed that EU High Representative Catherine Ashton had raised the issue with him in a meeting with him in Brunei but gave no further details of their exchange. He said he had yet to see details of the newspaper allegations.

“I will say that every country in the world that is engaged in international affairs and national security undertakes lots of activities to protect its national security and all kinds of information contributes to that. All I know is that is not unusual for lots of nations,” Kerry told a news conference.

Some EU policymakers said talks for a free trade agreement between Washington and the EU should be put on ice until further clarification from the United States.

Martin Schulz, president of the EU Parliament, told French radio the United States had crossed a line.

“I was always sure that dictatorships, some authoritarian systems, tried to listen … but that measures like that are now practiced by an ally, by a friend, that is shocking, in the case that it is true,” Schulz said in an interview with France 2.

Officials in Japan and South Korea said they were aware of the newspaper reports and had asked Washington to clarify them.

“I’m aware of the article, but we still haven’t confirmed the contents of the story. Obviously we’re interested in this matter and we’ll seek an appropriate confirmation on this,” said Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga at a regular news conference.

“We saw the report and will do a fact-check,” a South Korean government official said. The official declined to comment further, saying it was a media report without any clear evidence.

Officials in New Delhi did not have any immediate comment but India’s External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid, who is also in Brunei, told the ANI television service: “These are all areas of great strategic importance that we have to cooperate and collaborate in counter-terrorism measures.

“I think we continue to remain in touch and cooperate and (if) there is any concern we would convey it or they would convey it to us,” he added. (Reuters)

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