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Lashley calls for greater linkages

Raashid Ifill of Phoenix Animation winner of the inaugural National Animation Competition.

Raashid Ifill of Phoenix Animation winner of the inaugural National Animation Competition.

Minister of Culture, Sports and Youth, Stephen Lashley, wants to see greater linkages between culture, science and technology.

He made this assertion recently during a courtesy call with consultants of the e-Create Barbados Symposium at his ministry’s headquarters at Sky Mall.

The officials were Founder and Chief Executive Officer of ACB Knowledge Consultants Inc, Dr. Annalee Babb; Director of Andrew Senior Associates Ltd., Andrew Senior; Chairman of the International Organisation for Knowledge Economy and Enterprise Development, Professor Thomas Andersson; as well as officials of the National Cultural Foundation.

Lashley told the consultants that the Cultural Industries Bill was designed to act as a regulatory framework for the creative sector and indicated the legislation would create structure, which would hopefully move the sector forward.

He lauded the experts for their contribution towards a “successful” e-Create Barbados, and pointed out that, “e-Create Barbados has confirmed there is a need to build multi-sectoral linkages. The creative industry is an emerging one, but it is multifaceted. Culture is embedded in science and technology”.

Lashley said that “correlating collaborations and continuous engagement” were therefore required, especially if local creative practitioners were to get to the next stage.

“The most crucial thing is to continue an engagement [with the creative practitioners], despite the lack of resources. The creative industry needs to be built through linkages. We have seen a number of creative persons who are asking about the next stage [and] we need to take those people to the next level,” he maintained.

In response, Senior recommended further exploration and interrelations between culture and technology, adding that focus should also be placed on marketing and distribution.

“The concept of the creative industries is not well understood,” he observed, and stressed that the public might not fully appreciate that sector unless its earning potential was revealed.

Suggesting that data and statistics about the local industry were vital for moving practitioners forward, he said this information would also be beneficial to the private sector — whether national, regional or international.

Andersson added that e-Create Barbados was an excellent symposium, but urged Government to be proactive in moving the industry to the next level.

“All over the world culture is taken a bit too lightly; the only way to be successful is to ensure there is implementation. It must not become an academic exercise,” he advised.

Babb proposed the knowledge of creative practitioners should be engaged and utilised in an effort to increase income generation across various industries such as finance, insurance and construction.

“Culture is at the core of everything,” she reasoned.

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