Make them pay!

The Caribbean Secondary Examinationsnow held between early April to June. Lamar Grazette - outstanding performance in basketball, good CXC results in Physical Education. Rashida Codrington - vocal music excellence, good leadership in ISCF.
The Caribbean Secondary Examinations now held between early April to June.
Lamar Grazette – outstanding performance in basketball, good CXC results in Physical Education.
Rashida Codrington – vocal music excellence, good leadership in ISCF.

Students who waste the Government’s money should be made to pay, the acting principal of the Ellerslie Secondary School said today.

Making the school report during the speech day and prize giving ceremony, Ronald Leacock charged too many students were “too satisfied with a bare pass” and at times were unwilling to put in the hard work and effort required to go further.

“Students seem to believe that having paid for, or being entered to write the CXC examination is the same as having already received the certificate. And so many students do not complete or submit their School Based Assignments while others simply absent themselves from the examination.

“The time has come for a position to be taken on this waste of Government’s money and students who accept entry for a subject and behave in this way should be required to refund the examination fees,” Brathwaite stated this morning…

“You are the reason why Government commits about 20 per cent of our national budget to education. Too many of you are taking it for granted. You need to ask yourself: ‘Am I making the best use of the resource being spent on me?’…”

The state’s investment in education was also stressed by featured speaker and Ellerslie Secondary alumna Geralyn Edward.

She informed those in attendance the Government had spent $4.5 billion in education since the island’s independence, and as such, the most must be made of the investment.

“If there is one message that I want to leave with you today, it is that your education comes at a cost to your parents and to every taxpayer in this country,” the business editor at the Nation newspaper said to the students.

“Today, in this environment, second chances are becoming fewer, people are becoming more impatient and demanding more accountability for monies expended in every area, including education.”

Edward also called for changes on the part of teachers, stating: “This atmosphere needs innovation on the part of education providers, acceptance that not all or even most of these students will meet your expectations during their five-year stay here and it requires an acceptance that a successful prescription applied to one student will not always work for all.” (LW)

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