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Myrie sticks to her story

Roger Forde QC (left) Shanique Myrie (right).

Roger Forde QC (left) Shanique Myrie (right).

Barbados’ legal team has failed to get a Jamaican national to recant an allegation that she suffered a cavity search while trying to enter the island two years ago.

Shanique Myrie completed her testimony before the Caribbean Court of Justice panel taking evidence at the Jamaica Conference Centre in Kingston this morning, but not before insisting that her accusation was true.

This was during the final period of cross examination by the head of the legal team representing Barbados, Roger Forde, Q.C.

Myrie, whose testimony was followed by that of her former employer Julian Jackson, told the court she suffered a painful and inhumane cavity search at the Grantley Adams International Airport in March 2011.

And when Forde questioned her claim that the cell she was held before deportation back home was filthy, the witness said her statement was true.

Forde also suggested to Myrie that her denial of entry at the Barbados airport had nothing to do with the fact she was a Jamaica, and asked her if the immigration officer explained to her that she was refused entry because the woman she claims she was going to visit, a Pamela Clarke, told him she did not know Myrie.

Myrie said this was not the case and departed the witness stand maintaining her accusations.

Her case against Barbados is based on a claim that the alleged cavity search violated Barbadian laws, its international obligations and the revised Treaty of Chaguaramas.

The CCJ has†set aside this week to hear the evidence of witnesses of the Myrie and the Jamaica government, with hearings expected to conclude by Friday. While Myrie has six witnesses, her government has four. (SC)

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