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Essential to elections

Steven Williams (standing) explaining the software to Barbados TODAY Editor-in- chief, Roy Morris.

Steven Williams (standing) explaining the software to Barbados TODAY Editor-in- chief, Roy Morris.

The success of a locally produced election software package has its creators now looking to expand into the Commonwealth.

Steven Williams, director of CampaignOne, an election programme that was used by some of the Barbados Labour Party candidates recently, said after creating the software they are now satisfied it has operated as expected.

The software was designed last February to allow candidates on a constituency by constituency basis to keep track of their registered voters, including everything from party support to concerns, based on interaction with said voters during the canvass.

“There was more of a warm reception by new candidates,” Williams confessed, noting that those who used the software were able to see the exact results indicated by the product based on the amount of work they put into canvassing.

Next step

Asked about the next step, he stated, “For me it is the Commonwealth. All Commonwealth countries that I could get my hands on I would like to basically introduce them to the system. This is going to be my focus in the short term.”

Williams explained that after he returned from abroad streamlining the software and realised the potential, he and his partners began making moves to see how much of the Commonwealth could use such technology.

“When I came back and realised what we had, I realised it was time to start making some connections because at the end of the day it was far superior to what I saw in the States. The States as I said had good technology and a very good grasp of pieces of the system, so if we had a text based component in the system then the text base was fantastic, but we decided not to be a master of something specific but to become a jack of all trades and build up the mastery of that some,” he explained.

Mastering that sum means now that they have software that can be adapted to countries with electoral systems like Barbados, and can be used to track voters in everything from their preference for a party to how they are likely to vote in a given election, as well as individual peculiarities like disabilities, whether or not they intend to vote or whether they needed transportation to the polls. (LB)

One Response to Essential to elections

  1. Michael Callender February 28, 2013 at 7:03 am

    Love this. I think this is one of the way forward for Barbados. We need to start to focus on creating more indigenous software for our people in the region.


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