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Youth need support

dlpsharingsmileA young man who represented the Democratic Labour Party Government in the Senate, last night made a passionate plea for skilled youths to be facilitated in becoming entrepreneurs.

Damien Griffith was among the platform speakers supporting the DLP candidate for St. Michael West Central, James Paul, at a mass meeting in Grazettes, St. Michael.

“We need to develop education to ensure we are meeting these needs – refrigeration technician and engineers and mechanical engineers. We need to have people who can build businesses. Young people need to be facilitated and the DLP understands that,” Griffith said.

Griffith argued that the proposed†introduction of three new sixth form schools was a step in the right direction in preparing young people to enter the University of the West Indies. He said he believed that in order for Barbadians to get the best jobs, they must be equipped with the appropriate skills, particularly technical ones.

The former senator was of the view that the technical careers such as refrigeration engineers and mechanical engineers were the jobs commanding a steady income and the most money.

“Every child in Barbados should be brought along. When you are earning money it is more beneficial to learn a skill,” reasoned Griffith.

He acknowledged that education was critical in facilitating young entrepreneurs establishing their businesses, which could later employ other skilled young people.

“Many of young people going into the university are not ready,” said Griffith,, adding he felt that the proposed sixth forms were a step in the right direction in helping to correct this.

“We have said we want these sixth forms to take some of the pressure off the university so that when they [youth] enter university, they would be prepared,” added the young politician.

“It takes $30,000 per year at minimum to educate an individual at the university. Compare it to a sixth form school where it is $6,000 per year and a student gets direct attention,” pointed out Griffith.

He drew attention to a positive aspect of the current economic environment where enterprising young people found some solace. His example was Fund Access, which Griffith noted had recorded a 38 per cent growth in the last year and had allowed young business owners to get assistance in the areas where they normally fell down. (EJ)†SNbS

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