News Feed

October 27, 2016 - United win Manchester derby Juan Mata struck to win a tight Man ... +++ October 27, 2016 - IAAF wants Bolt’s services KINGSTON, Jamaica – IAAF Pres ... +++ October 27, 2016 - Proper shutdown protocol needed, says Bynoe The Department of Emergency Managem ... +++ October 27, 2016 - ‘Out of touch’ Economist Ryan Straughn says the la ... +++ October 27, 2016 - Lowe looking to protect the south coast A senior policymaker has warned tha ... +++ October 27, 2016 - Road Hockey 5s hit halfway mark After three weeks of competition th ... +++

Republicans accused of toying with Hagel confirmation

Secretary of defence nominee Chuck Hagel.

Secretary of defence nominee Chuck Hagel.

WASHINGTON — US Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid accused Republicans today of putting the country at risk by trying to delay a vote to confirm Chuck Hagel as President Barack Obama’s new secretary of defence.

“For the sake of our national security it is time for us to put aside political theatre,” Reid said.

The Nevada Democrat made an impassioned appeal for Hagel’s confirmation amid questions over whether he could get the 60 votes needed to overcome roadblocks preventing a vote.

Reid accused Republicans of trying to score political points by coming up with one reason after another to delay confirmation of a new Pentagon chief, including for the first time ever using the blocking tactic known as a filibuster to prevent a vote.

Panetta’s replacement

If confirmed, Hagel would replace retiring defence secretary Leon Panetta.

Democrats, who have remained united in support of Hagel, a former Republican senator from Nebraska, control 55 seats in the 100-member Senate and could confirm Hagel without any Republican backing. A cabinet nominee requires the support of only a simple majority to be confirmed.

However, they need the support of 60 senators to clear the procedural hurdles and allow the vote.

Opposition to Bush

Hagel broke from his party as a senator by opposing former President George W. Bush’s handling of the Iraq War, angering many of his Republican colleagues. Some members of his party have also raised questions about whether Hagel, 66, is sufficiently supportive of Israel, tough enough on Iran or capable of leading the Pentagon.

Earlier, two Republicans had said they would vote for Hagel and several others said they would oppose procedural hurdles, but those votes may not have held as bitter battling over Obama’s nominee have continued. (Reuters)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *