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Digging out

People arrive with their children and toboggans to a snowy Central Park in New YorkBOSTON/NEW YORK — The Northeast started digging itself out after a blizzard dumped up to 40 inches of snow with hurricane force winds, killing at least nine people and leaving hundreds of thousands without power.

By early today, utility companies were reporting roughly 350,000 customers still without electricity across a nine-state region after the wet, heavy snow brought down tree branches and power lines. About half a million had been down as of late Saturday.

Air traffic began to return to normal today after some 5,800 flights were cancelled Friday and yesterday, according to Flightaware, a flight tracking service.

Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, and Long Island MacArthur Airport reopened this morning. Both were closed yesterday.

Boston’s Logan International Airport reopened late yesterday, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Rare travel bans in Connecticut and Massachusetts were lifted but roads throughout the region remained treacherous, according to state transportation departments.

As the region recovered, another large winter storm building across the Northern Plains was expected to leave a foot of snow and bring high winds from Colorado to central Minnesota tomorrow, the National Weather Service said.

South Dakota was expected to be hardest hit, with winds reaching 50 miles per hour, creating white-out conditions. The storm was expected to reach parts of Nebraska, North Dakota, Wyoming and Wisconsin.

Friday and Saturday’s mammoth storm stretched from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic and covered several spots in the Northeast with more than three feet of snow. Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts took the brunt of the blizzard.

Hamden, Connecticut, had 40 inches and nearby Milford 38 inches, the National Weather Service said. (Reuters)

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