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Going through the process

A rundown of the nomination procedure

by Latoya Burnham

For some candidates, yesterday was a day of firsts, for others, who were old hands at the nomination process, it was smooth transition from being the person all knew was running for a particular seat, to the person who is now legally ready to contest the riding.

Many Barbadians knew yesterday was Nomination Day, and the highways and byways filled with yellow- and red-clad supporters heading to campaign houses to regroup, or to nomination centres for the big hoorah, reinforced the fact that the election pitch had just been kicked up a notch higher.

In the St. Peter nomination centre, Returning Officer Roger Small and Keith Headley worked like a well oiled machine, credit to not just a process through the local Electoral Office that runs a tight ship, but also to the fact that they have been working elections together since 1994.

It was these two who would give Barbados TODAY a fine breakdown of just what the process entails.

The announcement of elections, with a date selected for nomination, is traditionally the signal to prospective candidates to kick their intentions into gear. It means that the requisite $250 deposit has to be paid into the Treasury ahead of Nomination Day and the receipt received retained for proof on the day itself.

In the meantime, returning officers, clerks and other electoral officials undergo rigorous training, in most cases to refresh knowledge, replace those who would have moved out of the service, and others who would have been promoted to new duties.

At the nomination centre, on the strike of 10 a.m., the returning officer stands and reads the declaration to open nominations, following which candidates have until 3 p.m. to register. During that time, objections to the candidate can also be lodged, but the public also has an additional hour after the close of nominations to lodge further objections.

Continued on Pages 30 & 31

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