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Broomes’ principal attorney, Queen Council Vernon Smith (left) and Cecil McCarthy Q.C (File photo)

Having had cordial discussions with the chief personnel officer last Friday, and having dispatched correspondence to Government on their client’s behalf, lawyers for embattled principal Jeff Broomes are now awaiting the next move by the employer.

Broomes’ principal attorney, Queen Council Vernon Smith, told Barbados TODAY this evening they remained confident with their case and would continue to represent him to the fullest.

And while he would not go into details about the meeting or the correspondence sent on Broomes’ behalf, very reliable sources said the document was very specifically worded to ensure authorities understood clearly they had made some errors of judgement.

According to the source, Broomes acknowledged receipt of his letter of transfer, dated December 21 and hand delivered to him on January 2 at 1:30 p.m. It noted that his substantive title was principal of the Alexandra School to which he was appointed on August 1, 2002 by letter dated July 18, 2002.

The source said too that Broomes’ letter to authorities made it clear he did not accept the “appointment to the post of Principal at the Parkinson Memorial Secondary School, which has not been vacant, has not been advertised, and for which I have not applied”.

Barbados TODAY has learnt that the Public Service Commission had been due to meet today to discuss the correspondence from Broomes’ representatives as well as the details of the meeting last Friday with the chief personnel officer, but up to the time of publishing it was not clear whether that meeting had taken place.

Meanwhile, sources pointed out that one of the strengths of the argument of Broomes’ legal team is the ruling by then Chief Justice Sir Denys Williams in the case brought by public servant Ophelia King that the terms and conditions of service of a public servants are not contractual, but bound up in such statutes as the Public Service Act, Public Service Regulations and the General Orders. (RRM)

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